Will Windows 10 Make It To 20? IT Watchers Discuss - InformationWeek

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9/9/2015
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Will Windows 10 Make It To 20? IT Watchers Discuss

Industry analysts and InformationWeek editors predict the future of Microsoft's iconic operating system.
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The Mainstay Of Productivity
David Johnson, Principal Analyst for Infrastructure and Operations Professionals, Forrester
'Windows and Windows-based apps will continue to be the mainstay of enterprise productivity through at least 2020,' Johnson predicted. 'Windows 10 will not be the last major release of Windows, as many continue to speculate that it could be.' 
Microsoft's OS will continue to survive because of its dominance in enterprise productivity, according to Johnson. Employees across the globe continue to use Windows devices and apps for their daily tasks. The time and effort required of businesses and employees to haul their operations to another system is vast enough to keep Windows at the core of the enterprise -- for now.
Microsoft has to continue thinking ahead. 'This indispensability of Microsoft Windows for work, and the inertial resistance to switching, gives Microsoft time to continue to adapt their strategy as they go,' said Johnson. 'The move to more frequent Windows releases, with an easier migration path than in past releases, will be key in their ability to adapt.'
A key determinant in Windows' future will be the amount of time employees spend each day using PCs over alternative devices, said Johnson. The more often they use non-Windows apps and devices in the workplace, the easier it will be to move their tasks to a different platform, such as Mac OS, iOS, or Android.
Modern workers still spend more time on desktops and laptops than on tablets and smartphones, but trends can and will change, Johnson noted. Those who do use tablets for productivity are generally not using Windows, and the growing mobile trend could pose a high risk to Windows in the enterprise.
He pointed to a number of risk factors Microsoft will face as it continues to evolve. It will need to maintain customers' trust with information security and continue to provide a satisfying user experience despite employers' compliance and security policies.
Competitors pose another growing threat, he continued. Some are virtualizing Windows PCs and apps, making it possible to use Windows without a Windows device. Johnson also introduced the possibility that iOS, Android, or ChromeOS could build desktop apps, keyboards, and external displays that are easier to use than Microsoft products, further decreasing users' preference for Windows.
(Image: George Clerk/iStockPhoto)

The Mainstay Of Productivity

David Johnson, Principal Analyst for Infrastructure and Operations Professionals, Forrester

"Windows and Windows-based apps will continue to be the mainstay of enterprise productivity through at least 2020," Johnson predicted. "Windows 10 will not be the last major release of Windows, as many continue to speculate that it could be."

Microsoft's OS will continue to survive because of its dominance in enterprise productivity, according to Johnson. Employees across the globe continue to use Windows devices and apps for their daily tasks. The time and effort required of businesses and employees to haul their operations to another system is vast enough to keep Windows at the core of the enterprise -- for now.

Microsoft has to continue thinking ahead. "This indispensability of Microsoft Windows for work, and the inertial resistance to switching, gives Microsoft time to continue to adapt their strategy as they go," said Johnson. "The move to more frequent Windows releases, with an easier migration path than in past releases, will be key in their ability to adapt."

A key determinant in Windows' future will be the amount of time employees spend each day using PCs over alternative devices, said Johnson. The more often they use non-Windows apps and devices in the workplace, the easier it will be to move their tasks to a different platform, such as Mac OS, iOS, or Android.

Modern workers still spend more time on desktops and laptops than on tablets and smartphones, but trends can and will change, Johnson noted. Those who do use tablets for productivity are generally not using Windows, and the growing mobile trend could pose a high risk to Windows in the enterprise.

He pointed to a number of risk factors Microsoft will face as it continues to evolve. It will need to maintain customers' trust with information security and continue to provide a satisfying user experience despite employers' compliance and security policies.

Competitors pose another growing threat, he continued. Some are virtualizing Windows PCs and apps, making it possible to use Windows without a Windows device. Johnson also introduced the possibility that iOS, Android, or ChromeOS could build desktop apps, keyboards, and external displays that are easier to use than Microsoft products, further decreasing users' preference for Windows.

(Image: George Clerk/iStockPhoto)

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mak63
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50%
mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2015 | 9:34:18 PM
Cortana
"Cortana,... will eventually serve as the primary user experience."
I agree and I hope that this user experience becomes a reality. Star Trek fans are waiting for something like this for more than 20 years.
cyclepro
50%
50%
cyclepro,
User Rank: Moderator
9/11/2015 | 11:36:16 AM
Will Windows survive
I think that windows will continue on. What I think will happen that as time goes on Windows will evolve as technology evolves. Therefore updates will continue. However they may still call it Windows 10. As long as people continue to use laptops and desktops.

 

However Microsoft must be successful in other markets other than PC. They must be more successful in tablet and cell phones in order for Windows to survive. Also security must improve more. Since Windows and Android are open systems they will continue to be more vulnerable to hackers. Better screening of their app stores is needed.

 
GarethW368
50%
50%
GarethW368,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2015 | 3:46:43 AM
No
It wont make it 20 because MS has already stated this is the last Windows, going forward it will be a 'service'
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