Windows 10: 10 Things To Know At Launch - InformationWeek
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7/27/2015
08:05 AM
Nathan Eddy
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Windows 10: 10 Things To Know At Launch

The highly anticipated launch of Windows 10 finally arrives on July 29. Here are 10 things you should know about the impending release.
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(Image: Microsoft)

(Image: Microsoft)

In case you haven't heard, Microsoft's big release of Windows 10 -- accompanied by a worldwide marketing and media blitz -- is happening on July 29 and has got the tech world buzzing.

It's the first major upgrade to the Windows operating system in years. It contains not only the classic Start menu format, but also a version of the live tiles found in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

Besides the obvious product launch, Microsoft's ultimate goal with Windows 10 is to unify the Windows operating system across multiple Microsoft product families, including PCs, tablets, smartphones, embedded systems, and the Xbox One gaming console.

The company's marketing strategy is to reconnect with PC users and consumers at large by focusing on the human element of the operating system's capabilities and the degree to which users can personalize features and services.

Among the new features on Windows 10 is a new default Web browser, called Edge, which boasts annotation tools and offers integration with other Microsoft platforms present within Windows 10. The browser also connects with Microsoft's digital concierge -- Cortana -- which has been given a female voice similar to that of Apple's Siri platform.

[Check out what Microsoft got right with Windows 10.]

As InformationWeek has noted, anticipation is running high, and early reports and reviews indicated Microsoft has again started moving in the right direction after a series of missteps. But how much the release of Windows 10 will help the global PC market -- both in the enterprise and with consumers -- is still open to debate.

"In addition to the free upgrade for consumers for a year after the release, Windows 10 should be a net positive as there is pent-up demand for replacements of older PCs," IDC analyst Rajani Singh wrote in an April report.

So, if you are gearing up for the July 29 launch and want to be part of the marketing extravaganza, or if you are an IT professional who will start weighing the options of the upgrade, here are 10 things to know about the Windows 10 launch.

Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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MarkSitkowski
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MarkSitkowski,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2015 | 6:31:03 PM
Collateral Damage?
At the end of the day, I'm not really interested in the fluff and chrome. The issues nobody has mentioned in all the marketing hype, are

a) How much of my disk will the installation trash?

b) How many of the hundreds of applications on my PC will stop working?

 
Eldorado
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Eldorado,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2015 | 9:56:52 AM
Upgrading while not having personnal ISP
There are many who do not have an internet connection at home, and spend lots of time at places that offer free Wi-Fi. Some locations have rather slow connections. How will this work for them if they have reserved the Windows 10 upgrade but cannot complete the download before the location closes? Will they be able to pick up the download where it left off? This may cause some Sirius issues for them, if they must leave in the middle of the upgrade.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2015 | 8:20:15 AM
Re: Dev functions
Cortana does sound a bit like Clippy, let's hope that it is more Siri like and on demand than Clippy like and constantly popping up with advice.  The last thing I want is Cortana telling me jokes while I'm opening documents.

 

The thing that I still don't get is why Microsoft keeps saying "free for the first year".  If you've got a device with Win 7 or 8 then why does it matter if you upgrade in the first year? Or does Microsoft plan on an OS subscription that will turn into an annual fee?  The wording of that just seems odd to me.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2015 | 6:21:14 AM
Re: Dev functions
I like the fact that they have made it free for people who has windows 7 or 8.1. This will help them to grab the market soon.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2015 | 2:30:21 PM
Re: Dev functions
Cortana is like the paper clip guy, only she is present everywhere. I wonder if Cortana would be customisable from the start.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2015 | 2:29:10 PM
Dev functions
PowerShell would be game changing if done right. I also heard the dev support would be better since this is a one platform experience hence devs can develop mobile apps and launch then on the OS without worrying about compatibility issues. Consumers and normal users can heave a sigh of relief now.
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