Windows 10: 7 Pressing Questions For Microsoft - InformationWeek

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1/28/2015
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Kelly Sheridan
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Windows 10: 7 Pressing Questions For Microsoft

Microsoft's Windows 10 announcements and earnings call gave a snapshot of its future but also raised many questions in the tech community.
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(Image: Microsoft)
(Image: Microsoft)

The tech world was abuzz on Jan. 21 with the news of Microsoft's announcements surrounding Windows 10. Now that the dust has settled, businesses and consumers have plenty of questions about the future of the operating system -- and of the company.

It's an exciting time for Microsoft, a software behemoth that hasn't been lauded as a "cool" player in the tech space for many years. The wave of new features it recently unveiled, from universal apps to social gaming, has the potential to revolutionize the company's status as an innovator. Windows 10 is expected to push the envelope even more.

The changes poised to take place at Microsoft do more than provide new user interfaces across its many devices; they are designed to tie together its entire product line and help the people who use them work with one another. This strategy is evident through the creation of an Office 365 with touchscreen capabilities and the Microsoft Surface Hub collaboration device.

"There is nothing subtle about this strategy," said CEO Satya Nadella during the Jan. 21 event. "It's about aligning our goals of success for Windows with customers, and their experience and engagement with Windows."

[Microsoft Power BI Gets "Freemium" Visual Makeover]

Now that the dust has settled from the most recent release of the new operating system features, the tech community is raising questions about how certain aspects of Microsoft's strategy will work, and how its customers will benefit from these changes going forward.

There are plenty of changes to excite Windows users, but they'll have to have patience as more details and builds of the new OS roll out over the next few months. The January build for Windows 10 is already available for desktop users, but those waiting on mobile will have to sit tight until its February launch. 

Microsoft's most recent earnings call painted a more detailed picture of how the company anticipates growth throughout this year. While the cloud and Surface tablet businesses are strong, and smartphones also performed well in its most recent quarter, it will be interesting to see how Windows 10 affects performance in 2015.

With that in mind InformationWeek decided to look at seven pressing questions for Microsoft about Windows 10. Here's what we found.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
1/31/2015 | 4:09:32 PM
Re: Time will tell
@mejiac,

That's one check in the positive column for me already!
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
1/31/2015 | 4:02:45 PM
Re: Time will tell
@pcharles09,

Oh, I concur, not only is it distracting, I can also lead to loss of productivity.

I think this is why Windows 10 provides the option to re-enable the classic start menu, which I bet most enterprises will probably configuer it to be both the default and not allow the user the option to revert to the metro UI (which has been pointed in various forums, it's just plain distracting)
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2015 | 6:55:02 PM
Re: Time will tell
@mejiac,

I can understand the interface on the surface but not a laptop. Most business users wouldn't use a touch screen for office use. It slows oyu down in many instances. I know because I've asked.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
1/29/2015 | 3:02:03 PM
Re: Trying to get ahead of the curve
Thanks, @mejiac! I'm hoping we can get some definitive answers as Microsoft continues development. As for the free upgrade, I agree that it was a smart move. If Windows 10 can live up to the hype, Microsoft will have plenty of happy campers.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
1/29/2015 | 2:56:34 PM
Re: Time will tell
@asksqn, laughing at your reference to Windows 8 as a "steaming pile of fail" -- I know plenty of consumers would agree. You're right, it does look like Microsoft is addressing its shortcomings (or at least, it seems to be). Hopefully Windows 10 won't fail to meet expectations.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 2:51:58 PM
Universal apps
Apple made it work when it was transitioning Macintosh between POWER and x86, but the cost was much bigger execs.  I'm guessing that MS will have to do the same or rely on some sort of bytecode interpreter.

 "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch" is probably the least escapeable of all engineering principles (except possibly for the laws of thermodynamics).

 
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 2:34:07 PM
Trying to get ahead of the curve
Kelly,

Excellent Article!

I think you capture the questions that most of us have in our heads, and most companies are worrying about.

I do think that Microsoft is definitly heading down the right path, since providing a free OS is something that many folks will seek to adopt when it becomes available (specially students and consuomers on a budget)

Building an Ecosystem that's consistent across different platforms is essential for microsoft (which is one of the things I love about Android and chrome)

So really looking forward to it
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 2:30:55 PM
Re: Spartan
@[email protected],

For many companies, even thought developers really dislike working with IE (specially with legacy applications that are only certified to work on the old IE8), sadly for many industries (specially those like finance) default to IE because of it's security features (although this can be debated)
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 2:28:58 PM
Re: Time will tell
@pcharles09,

I share your thoughts.... I also didn't adopt Windows 8, since I honestly just didn't find it appealing, not to mention that the Metro UI was more of a distraction than anything else.

I will say that using the Surface Pro was actually pretty good, granted ony when traveling and the occasional email.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 2:27:06 PM
Re: happy camper
@[email protected],

I've been test driving Windows 10 Technical Preview since it was made availble. As I've posted I've honestly haven't had any major issues (yeah, it does freeze up on me sometimes, but only with specific software use, i.e. Itunes for some reason). I honestly like it and am definitly looking forward for it to be made avaialble for the Enterprise...the Multiple Desktop features is something that I actually found to increase my productivity, and the ability to run apps on the desktop was definitly a good plus (I motivied me to dedicated a PC has a HTPC)
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