Windows 10: 7 Pressing Questions For Microsoft - InformationWeek

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1/28/2015
01:06 PM
Kelly Sheridan
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Windows 10: 7 Pressing Questions For Microsoft

Microsoft's Windows 10 announcements and earnings call gave a snapshot of its future but also raised many questions in the tech community.
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(Image: Microsoft)
(Image: Microsoft)

The tech world was abuzz on Jan. 21 with the news of Microsoft's announcements surrounding Windows 10. Now that the dust has settled, businesses and consumers have plenty of questions about the future of the operating system -- and of the company.

It's an exciting time for Microsoft, a software behemoth that hasn't been lauded as a "cool" player in the tech space for many years. The wave of new features it recently unveiled, from universal apps to social gaming, has the potential to revolutionize the company's status as an innovator. Windows 10 is expected to push the envelope even more.

The changes poised to take place at Microsoft do more than provide new user interfaces across its many devices; they are designed to tie together its entire product line and help the people who use them work with one another. This strategy is evident through the creation of an Office 365 with touchscreen capabilities and the Microsoft Surface Hub collaboration device.

"There is nothing subtle about this strategy," said CEO Satya Nadella during the Jan. 21 event. "It's about aligning our goals of success for Windows with customers, and their experience and engagement with Windows."

[Microsoft Power BI Gets "Freemium" Visual Makeover]

Now that the dust has settled from the most recent release of the new operating system features, the tech community is raising questions about how certain aspects of Microsoft's strategy will work, and how its customers will benefit from these changes going forward.

There are plenty of changes to excite Windows users, but they'll have to have patience as more details and builds of the new OS roll out over the next few months. The January build for Windows 10 is already available for desktop users, but those waiting on mobile will have to sit tight until its February launch. 

Microsoft's most recent earnings call painted a more detailed picture of how the company anticipates growth throughout this year. While the cloud and Surface tablet businesses are strong, and smartphones also performed well in its most recent quarter, it will be interesting to see how Windows 10 affects performance in 2015.

With that in mind InformationWeek decided to look at seven pressing questions for Microsoft about Windows 10. Here's what we found.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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H@mmy
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[email protected],
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 9:51:31 AM
Spartan
Internet explorer and its variations have always been a pain for web developers. I hope Spartan changes things. I really liked the idea of changing the name and not coming up with another Internet Explorer X version. 
H@mmy
50%
50%
[email protected],
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2015 | 9:28:21 AM
Re: happy camper
Free upgrade to Win 10, cant wait to more. Its a very smart move by microsoft to expand it user base.On the other hand I would still wait for someone to upgrade before I upgrade myself. I still think upgrading could be risky.
pcharles09
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50%
pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2015 | 10:50:28 PM
Re: Time will tell
@asksqn,

I'm usually in the crowd that waits for the *.1 version to be released before I jump in. But I didn't even use Win8. 8.1 is decent minus the Metro UI. It just seems like a little faster Win7 build.

But I've heard a lot of hype about 10, especially since 9 was skipped. So let's hope it packs the punch of 2 release versions in 1!
asksqn
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50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2015 | 6:59:14 PM
Time will tell
On the surface, Win10 **seems** like it could be a lot better than the steaming pile of fail known as Windows 8.  Hopefully this will be the case.  
bartholmberg
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bartholmberg,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2015 | 5:35:06 PM
Fix 260 character file name length limitation
Windows is the best development environment - bar none.  However MS should fix this one - it's a problem and it is a growing problem.  It seems to me almost willful ignorance by MS at this point.

 

Read some of the frustration this causes to the developers (unfortunately this post doesn't allow links)  - search for "Fix 260 character file name length limitation"

 

Still windows 10 looks decent - like the universal app.  Still they need an answer for very small devices - Current Wince doesn't compete well with linux in that space. 

 
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2015 | 5:24:05 PM
Re: happy camper
@mak63, Windows 10 does show some early signs of being the "fully baked" version of Windows 8. I think the most interesting parts of the whole announcement, though, surround all the attention being given to HoloLens and the subscription model. Other factors are getting a little notice, but aspects some would consider peripheral are getting far more attention from the press and social media.

I wonder whether that means that the core Windows functionality is simply taken for granted, or if there are other, more disturbing (from Microsoft's perspective) reasons for the lack of excitement about the main product.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2015 | 4:55:36 PM
happy camper
I'm very excited with the latest Microsoft's OS.
There are many things to be enthusiastic about. From Cortana to the new Start Menu, Spartan and much more, but above all for many, a free upgrade.
I'm sure, and many would agree with me, when I say that Windows 10 will be what Windows 7 was to Vista. If no more.

Anyone disagree?
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