Windows 10 Upgrade: 8 FAQs Explained - InformationWeek
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6/26/2015
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Kelly Sheridan
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Windows 10 Upgrade: 8 FAQs Explained

July 29 is fast approaching and we know you still have a lot of questions about how to download and use Windows 10.
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(Image: Microsoft)

(Image: Microsoft)

Windows watchers have been marking their calendars for July 29, the day that Windows 10 will launch in full.

The closer we get to launch day, the more we learn about the myriad upgrades and changes coming to Windows 10. Microsoft has been working to ensure that this system addresses the shortcomings and failures we saw in predecessor Windows 8.

Windows 10 marks plenty of big changes in how Microsoft designs its products and how it delivers those products to customers. July 29 will mark Microsoft's final numbered OS launch, a break from the tradition that brought us from the original Windows through Windows 8.1.

This doesn't mean the end of Windows updates, but it does indicate a transformational change at Microsoft. We won't hear about Windows 11 or Windows 25, but we will see new features delivered through this Windows-as-a-service platform.

[Windows 10 Vs. Mac OS X 10.11: System Showdown]

And it seems that Microsoft will have plenty of new updates rolling out after Windows 10 hits the market. We're looking forward to seeing future advancements in Cortana, in Microsoft Edge, and in the ways HoloLens will eventually fit into the enterprise.

Its new service-based strategy is another sign that Microsoft is changing to keep up with other major tech leaders. Since he stepped into his role as CEO, Satya Nadella has emphasized the importance of working as a services company in addition to prioritizing cloud and mobile technologies.

Microsoft hopes by the three-year anniversary of its launch, Windows 10 will run on one billion devices. There will be a lot of people downloading the new OS in coming months, and most (if not all) of them have a question or two about the specifics of the upgrade process.

Let's clarify some of the most common questions surrounding the Windows 10 upgrade. Did we miss one? Ask your question in the comments and we'll do our best to answer it.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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alexansp
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alexansp,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2015 | 9:40:56 AM
Re: 1 billion
While we all enjoy the concept of getting stuff for $0 (free), the reality is that the creation of Windows 10 did not cost Microsoft $0 (free).  I think that may people are willing to pay for Windows 10..... it just should not cost many $$$.  I would suggest selling OS for much less than previous versions in the past.  Lets get back to the model of making one's product affordable for everyone to be able to running Windows 10.  As Microsoft has learned..... when you make your newly release version of Windows too high & already have a great Windows version currently in use by many users.... people choose to continue using older version instead of migrating to newer version.  In the longer run, it is more expense to support older versions of software.  All software companies need to find way make their customers an important value to migrate to new version of their software instead of keep using older versions.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/6/2015 | 9:50:04 AM
7 versions
I still can't believe they are releasing 7 different versions of Win10, what happened to one OS across all platforms? Why not offer stripped down installs rather than different versions for some of the more restricted platforms?  
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/5/2015 | 2:22:43 PM
Re: 1 billion

@mak63    I agree.   Charge up front otherwise don't charge at all.  Come on Microsoft - we know you can afford it.

gfish66
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gfish66,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2015 | 9:19:14 AM
Re: Windows 10
@tzubair: Why would any user want to do that? I mean what advantage will it bring? Savings in the registration cost?

Why would anyone want to do that?  Really?

Our corporation has 100 Win7 clients in 4 locations, plus a dozen mobile users...and a single IT person.  It is not possible to test all apps and hardware for all users and deploy Win 10 within the one year window.  But I would at least like to have the license to do this later on if desired.

 

 
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:43:12 AM
1 billion
How are they gonna reach a billion users, if Microsoft is gonna start charging for Win 10 $100-$199 after a year? I believe Windows 10 should remain free.
hwd469ki
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hwd469ki,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2015 | 3:58:26 PM
Number of registrations?
It's not clear to me if there is a need to register every qualified system prior to the July 29th release or is one registartion suffiicent for multiple systems. I guess if unsure one should register all of them?
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2015 | 5:32:31 PM
Mobile Devices
What can we expect to be offered in Windows 10 for Mobile Devices? Are we going to see some major upgrades from Windows 8.1? Are there features specifically designed to cater to the Mobile users and the devices? I think Windows 8.1 for Mobile had a lot of improvements needed so I am looking forward to the upgrades on mobile now.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2015 | 5:28:57 PM
Re: July 29 and Benefit of Doubt
"I had requested a upgrade (?) to my Windows 8.1 device and received an email thanking me but no date to expect it  - Why must I hear from a 3 rd party  the install date ?   "

@Technocrati: I think people have upgraded their Windows 8.1 devices through a web link that was shared internally with Microsoft employees. I don't think it's out there for public yet.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2015 | 5:24:57 PM
Re: Windows 10
"Will it be possible to register for Win10 and download it, but hold off on installing, even after the 1 year if desired? "

@gfish: Why would any user want to do that? I mean what advantage will it bring? Savings in the registration cost?
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2015 | 11:38:04 AM
July 29 and Benefit of Doubt

July 29.    This is the first I have heard of this date.   I had requested a upgrade (?) to my Windows 8.1 device and received an email thanking me but no date to expect it  - Why must I hear from a 3 rd party  the install date ?   

I checked my email again before I drafted this post and still nothing -  I am trying to give Microsoft the benefit of the doubt, I wonder if they would do the same thing if I had no license for their software - well I think I know the answer to that.

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