Windows 10 Vs. Windows 7: What Enterprise IT Needs To Know - InformationWeek
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8/9/2015
12:06 PM
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Windows 10 Vs. Windows 7: What Enterprise IT Needs To Know

Windows 7 organizations are starting to look at Windows 10. What are the major points of comparison? Read on to see what the changes could mean for your company.
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(Image: Dave Harding & Kelly Sheridan)

(Image: Dave Harding & Kelly Sheridan)

Windows 10 is in the field now, and enterprise IT departments will start getting serious questions from their users. When will Windows 10 be installed on enterprise systems? How soon will we be able to get rid of our old Windows 7 systems? How will Windows 10 make our systems better? These are all reasonable questions. Do you have the answers?

It's worth taking a careful look at the differences between Windows 7 and Windows 10. Why these two, rather than comparisons with all the other versions of Windows that are still in use? Let's take a moment to consider that question.

First, let's go with the obvious: If you're still deploying Windows XP, Windows Vista, or (heaven help you) something even older, then you're strongly advised to consider updating all your systems as soon as possible. There are many reasons for this, but we can use one word -- security -- to stand in for almost all of them. In fairness, if your computers aren't attached to the Internet in any way, and you're only using existing custom applications, you're welcome to use Windows XP, or even Windows 98, for as long as you can find the drivers to keep your hardware and software talking. But if the Internet is part of your communication infrastructure, then it's time to go modern.

[Read how Windows 10 will change IoT for good.]

What if you've already gone modern and have moved your systems to Windows 8 or 8.1? In that case, the move to Windows 10 is even easier to justify. There should be no issues with hardware compatibility, and the improvements in performance, features, security, and manageability make a strong case for moving up. Add to that the fact that your users will have already scaled the height of the learning curve for the new interface, and Windows 10 is the way to go.

So Windows 7 is the point of comparison. What are some of the key issues to explore as you're making the decision between Windows 7 and Windows 10? Here are eight of the most important ones, and the reasons they deserve your consideration.

Curtis Franklin Jr. is executive editor for technical content at InformationWeek. In this role he oversees product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he acts as executive producer for InformationWeek Radio and Interop Radio where he works with ... View Full Bio

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energywar
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energywar,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2016 | 10:34:35 PM
Re: Desktop Market Share
what a pathetic article - total lack of analysis from all angles.
bitturai
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bitturai,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/13/2015 | 3:33:04 AM
Re: Still no compelling reason to re-invest.
yeah its same old one
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2015 | 8:34:27 AM
Re: Desktop Market Share
While Win10 is hardly a horrible OS, I do want to second the sentiment here that if you think all your problems are over when you upgrade you're in for a surprise.  I've had a couple upgrades go very smoothly, a couple others not so smoothly.  I spent a day poking at one because I didn't want to drop back and do a fresh install, everywhere I turned as the advice "just scrap the upgrade and install fresh".  I really wanted to know what was causing all the drama with this particular upgrade because the errors it would report and the behavior was just odd.  That feature of it always trying to authenticate with AD? That's really annoying when it won't let you log in to a device that has never seen and AD controller in its life and you're getting errors about not being able to connect to AD.  Long story short, about a dozen things would go from working to not working to working at random, the symptoms all pointed to network problems, turns out the culprit was an application for advanced graphic card features.  

 

Also I'm still upset that they took away the charms bar, the one Win 8.1 feature that I liked. 

 
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2015 | 2:24:34 PM
Re: Windows 8 upgrade is the only reason I see
I agree.  I have been putting off the upgrade on one of my systems only because everything seems to finally work well, and i am worried about availability of programs and driver support so early in the game.  That being said, the new features look very promising and as the platform gets more stable, I expect to see more great reasons to upgrade.

For now, I'll stay with 8 until I know my systems have all the right updates in place to avoid jumping on the upgrade train too early.
MarkB07401
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MarkB07401,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/10/2015 | 12:35:13 PM
Windows 8 upgrade is the only reason I see
Most of these are not really reasons to upgrade. That the feature list is complete is not a reason to upgrade, the features would have to be the reason. So far its hit and miss for me, Edge isn't useful - we already have a no-extensions non-backwardly compatible browser in IE11 fullscreen, can't use it - we need backwards compatibility for legacy websites so we will continue to use IE. Cortana isn't useful (at least right now) it only works with Microsoft accounts, if you use a domain account it won't work at all.

 

So far the only reason I see to upgrade is to get rid of the small number of Windows 8 (and 8.1) we have on the touch devices they came with. Rather than trying to endlessly teach users on the charms and how to get out of full-screen apps they accidentally get into, we can just dump it and start teaching them Windows 10 instead.

 

 
ANON1248276995498
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ANON1248276995498,
User Rank: Strategist
8/10/2015 | 11:09:11 AM
Windows direction...
I think MS thinks consumers care way more about their computer's operating system than they actually do. The short end of it is that the OS is just the platform that lets me run my programs and applications... and these are what enable me to be productive and to make money. Once my computer is booted up and I am into Word, Excel, Photoshop, or whatever program, the version of windows I am running is just some distant memory. Sure, I want my computer to be secure and stable, but I have that with my Win 7 computers, as I did with Win XP.

I think there are two main features that would really excite me:
  • Like my personal files and documents, I want my programs to work regardless of what version of Windows I have.
  • Help make it easier for me to find documents and programs.

For past versions of Windows, computer performance tends to degrade with time as fixes, patches, security updates, etc. are applied, and installing a new Windows version on top of a computer with these problems does not really fix these problems. The most reliable way to update it was to either buy a new computer with the new version already installed or to reformat your hard disk and start afresh. In either case, you typically have to reinstall all of your programs when you update Windows. I would love to see MS move in a direction where programs, like personal documents, are completely abstracted out from the OS. I would love to be able install the next version without having to deal with my applications.

With respect to making it easier to find documents and programs, Cortana seems to be a step in the right direction. I've always thought that the touch screen concept for a desktop is useless. I don't want to have to take my hands off my keyboard or mouse just to activate some program. Anyway, the thought of being able to say, "find this file..., open this program..., or activate this feature", without having to move my mouse around seems pretty cool. 
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2015 | 10:33:09 AM
Re: Still no compelling reason to re-invest.
@jastroff,  yep same old same old.  Most resisted Vista, sticking with XP until Win7 is out for a while.  Looks like a redo sticking with Win7 until Win10 is out for awhile.
SEPPLEY
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SEPPLEY,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/10/2015 | 10:31:26 AM
Re: Desktop Market Share
Nothing here about privacy issues. Maybe Curtis, just "trusts" MS to do the right thing. Here's a cut from the EULA that seems to suggest that MS wants it all;

"Finally, we will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary."

So, if your HR manager has a salary spreadsheet accesssable by Windows 10, it is open to retreival by MS when MS believes it is necessary?
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2015 | 10:14:17 AM
Re: Desktop Market Share
So I take it you haven't been keeping tabs on the track record of Windows 10 updates.  As a beta tester and current user of Windows 10 your grief with udpates will not be over by switching to Windows 10.  So if that's your major reason for moving to Windows 10 you should stay put.
jastroff
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50%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/10/2015 | 10:11:02 AM
Re: Still no compelling reason to re-invest.
Really good point -- and correct for enterprises. MSFT has the time and money to wait until installs age in place, and then upgrade...what an odd game to play all these years

>>  However those with a Windows 7 Enterprise infrastructure not in need of upgrade or replace there is much less reason to make the move.   Most Windows 7 Enterprise installs have already provided for better update manage found in Win10 either with Microsoft tools or third party.  Same goes for mobile management as most have implemented third party products. 
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