Facebook 'Privacy Dinosaur' Warns Before Posts Go Public - InformationWeek

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4/4/2014
09:06 AM
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Facebook 'Privacy Dinosaur' Warns Before Posts Go Public

You might think privacy is extinct, but Facebook has introduced a friendly blue dinosaur that warns when you are about to post something publicly.
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SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
4/14/2014 | 7:14:20 AM
Re: Hooray for the Facebook privacy dinosuar
@ David F. Carr, haha very well said. Keeping in mind the past attitude of Facebook toward privacy, it makes sense as well. But apart from dinosaur, it is an interesting and surprising move from Facebook. It is difficult to understand though what prompted Facebook to add this feature. But this instant popup will certainly help a lot of people who don't really like to explore the options available. 
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
4/14/2014 | 7:14:06 AM
Re : Facebook 'Privacy Dinosaur' Warns Before Posts Go Public
Thank you for this very useful post. I found some very useful information about privacy settings in this post which will be helpful in doing my future posting more precisely. For example I didnít know that changing the audience one time for one post changes the audiences of all future posts.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2014 | 9:49:35 AM
Re: Hooray for the Facebook privacy dinosuar
...or that privacy is extinct, just like the dinosaurs. :-)
Thomas Claburn
IW Pick
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/4/2014 | 4:46:38 PM
Re: Hooray for the Facebook privacy dinosuar
>My first thought was actually that Facebook developers think people who care about privacy are dinosaurs.

Trust your first impression.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
4/4/2014 | 4:02:16 PM
Re: Hooray for the Facebook privacy dinosuar
I Like you, you Like me ...

My first thought was actually that Facebook developers think people who care about privacy are dinosaurs.
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
4/4/2014 | 3:02:55 PM
Re: Hooray for the Facebook privacy dinosuar
I agree this is a smart move, but why the 8 bit Barney?
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
4/4/2014 | 2:09:52 PM
Re: A positive change
@Shane yes, even PR moves could have a positive effect.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
4/4/2014 | 1:49:50 PM
Re: A positive change
It's great to see Facebook -- the king of sneaky opt-out privacy settings -- looking out for the user. The blue dinosaur warning is a small thing but it helps build trust. It's a PR move but a good one.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
4/4/2014 | 12:45:07 PM
Re: A positive change
@Kristin yse, even with email when the pull down menu pulled down the wrong name, and I only realized when the unintended recipient replied.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
4/4/2014 | 10:17:15 AM
A positive change
It's certainly uncharacteristic of Facebook, but a positive step in a new direction that will help teens and adults manage their settings. I think we've all been in a situation where we shared something accidentally with a broader audience than we intended.
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