Sony, 3M Reach Settlement In Patent Dispute - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Hardware & Infrastructure

Sony, 3M Reach Settlement In Patent Dispute

Under the settlement, Sony and Sony Electronics have agreed to license 3M-developed materials for cathodes in batteries.

Sony and 3M on Monday said they have reached a settlement in a federal lawsuit in which 3M accused the consumer electronics company and others of infringing on its patented technology found in lithium-ion batteries, a rechargeable power supply used in devices ranging from mobile phones to notebook computers.

Under the settlement, Sony and Sony Electronics have agreed to license 3M-developed materials for cathodes, which are the positive electrodes in batteries. Terms of the agreement were not released.

3M filed its lawsuit in March in U.S. District Court in Minnesota, naming as defendants CDW, Hitachi, Lenovo, Matsushita Industrial Electric, Panasonic Corp. of North America, Sony, and others. The suit sought damages that 3M argued should be tripled under the law for the defendants' "willful infringement." In addition, 3M wanted the court to issue a permanent injunction stopping the defendants from violating the company's patents.

3M claimed the defendants imported or sold patent-infringing lithium-ion batteries, or products that contained them. 3M claims it has invested significant resources in design, development, and commercialization of advanced material technologies, and believes its inventions over the last 10 years are pivotal to the development of next-generation high-performance batteries.

While unrelated to the 3M suit, Sony notebook batteries were responsible for the largest consumer electronics recall in history. Since last year, almost 10 million Sony lithium-ion batteries have been recalled due to incidents in which the devices burst into flames. Computer makers involved in the recalls have included Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Gateway, Acer America, and Toshiba.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The State of IT & Cybersecurity Operations 2020
The State of IT & Cybersecurity Operations 2020
Download this report from InformationWeek, in partnership with Dark Reading, to learn more about how today's IT operations teams work with cybersecurity operations, what technologies they are using, and how they communicate and share responsibility--or create risk by failing to do so. Get it now!
Slideshows
10 Ways to Prepare Your IT Organization for the Next Crisis
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  5/20/2020
News
IT Spending Forecast: Unfortunately, It's Going to Hurt
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  5/15/2020
Commentary
Helping Developers and Enterprises Answer the Skills Dilemma
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  5/19/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Key to Cloud Success: The Right Management
This IT Trend highlights some of the steps IT teams can take to keep their cloud environments running in a safe, efficient manner.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll