Sony Still On The Hot Seat - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
News

Sony Still On The Hot Seat

Even though Sony decided to suspend using controversial copy-protection technology, consumers and network managers are still furious.

Despite Sony BMG Music Entertainment's decision to stop using its controversial copy-protection technology, the anger generated by what one expert called "inept-ware" is unlikely to subside anytime soon.

Security experts believe that the world's second largest music label failed to see the ramifications when it chose to install the software without first seeking permission from PC users, and then using technology called a "rootkit" to hide its presence. The software came with 20 music CDs sold by Sony BMG.

But some customers of the record company and its parent, Sony Corp., were far less forgiving.

"I am personally making it a policy of mine that from this point on, Sony won't be able to sell me anything," Dennis Barr, Kansas City, Mo., said. "My family has a PS2 (PlayStation 2) plus some games, and I have a Sony CD player in my stereo rack. But no more -- no Sony music, no Sony appliances, no Sony gadgets of any kind. They've lost my business for life, because they were too damn dumb to realize just what they were doing."

Besides the hit Sony has taken among customers, its brand appears to have also been tainted.

"I don't condone piracy, but the unbridled greed of Sony is disgusting," Michael King, Salinas, Calif., said. "They are saying what the others (record companies) think - they own the information forever, even if you buy it, and have the unlimited right to control the information, including its use no matter what or where."

While not under-playing the seriousness of Sony's technology, which hackers have exploited in an attempt to hide malicous software, security experts believe the company made a bad decision in trying to do something right, which is protect its property.

Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos Plc, called the technology, which was developed by U.K.-based First4Internet, "inept-ware."

"I don't think it was malicious in its intent," Cluley said.

However, a poll of systems administrators by Sophos found a far stronger opinion, which Cluley called "typical."

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
2020 State of DevOps Report
2020 State of DevOps Report
Download this report today to learn more about the key tools and technologies being utilized, and how organizations deal with the cultural and process changes that DevOps brings. The report also examines the barriers organizations face, as well as the rewards from DevOps including faster application delivery, higher quality products, and quicker recovery from errors in production.
Slideshows
Data Science: How the Pandemic Has Affected 10 Popular Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  9/9/2020
Commentary
How to Eliminate Disruptive Technology's Risk
Andrew Froehlich, President & Lead Network Architect, West Gate Networks,  8/31/2020
News
How Analytics Helped Accenture's Pandemic Plans
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  9/1/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT Automation Transforms Network Management
In this special report we will examine the layers of automation and orchestration in IT operations, and how they can provide high availability and greater scale for modern applications and business demands.
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll