15 Surprising Facts About Indian Outsourcers - InformationWeek

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IT Leadership // Enterprise Agility
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9/30/2014
09:06 AM
Shane O'Neill
Shane O'Neill
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15 Surprising Facts About Indian Outsourcers

Thinking of outsourcing with Infosys, Wipro, or Tata? Here are some points worth knowing about the IT services heavyweights.

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nasimson
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50%
nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
11/28/2014 | 10:28:59 AM
Re: mind boggling
@vbierschwale01:



I exactly did what you said - and what an eye opener it is.

The text at the top says:
When we buy steel bars for dollar 20 from England, then America has the rail and the England has the money.

When we buy steel bars for dollar 25 from America, then America has the rail and the money.

What a powerful analogy.
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
10/1/2014 | 11:32:23 AM
Re: mind boggling
thank you, this days with speedy changes in technology, no one could really see the trends, or know what Co. future will be...
PedroGonzales
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50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
10/1/2014 | 9:56:20 AM
Re: mind boggling
@bateye.  I agree. It didn't take Indian companie a long time to become global IT super powers.  May be as a country we should try to imitate what these companies are doing right. Otherwise, our IBMs will be have a hard time to compete with them, may be they are having a hard time now.
vbierschwale01
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0%
vbierschwale01,
User Rank: Strategist
10/1/2014 | 7:24:23 AM
Re: mind boggling
There is something that everybody seems to be missing.

Google Infosys investor relations and take a look at their last annual earnings report.

Only 2% of their revenue comes from India and the majority is from America.

Now go to Keep America At Work and click on "Where are the jobs" and click on the quantity link in the computer and mathematical row and drill down to your city after clicking on Infosys or any of these big companies.

Don't forget to look at the management quantity as well.

When you get down to the city that you live in, send me an email at [email protected] if the wages they are paying those people is not comparable to what your job used to pay.

This is their achilles heel.
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
10/1/2014 | 12:42:47 AM
Re: mind boggling
@nasimson, same here, as this giants never look like giants to me... but now it global IT giants... 
nasimson
50%
50%
nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 12:03:42 PM
mind boggling
I knew that TCS, Vipro and InfoSys were Indian IT giants. Didnt know that these are global IT giants already. The stats are mind boggling. Seems like Indians are soon to overtake world IT. When your company's data is in cloud you dont know if its in kentucky, connecticut, chinnai or calcutta.
JakeL642
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0%
JakeL642,
User Rank: Strategist
9/30/2014 | 11:23:29 AM
H-1b Gave a Monopoly based on Job Desctruction to the Offshore Outsourcing Companies
These Offshore Outsourcing companies have grown big because the H-1b Federal Government program allows them to use DISCRIMINATON AS A TOOL to replace US citizens, with H-1b-Trainees.

The better qualified, more experienced, US citizens are never given a chance to compete for the job, by taking a competitive pay-cut.

This effectively destroys the Free Market in the United States, and gives Offshore Outsourcing companies a complete monopoly on who gets hired and who gets fired.  They use that monopoly to create a larger IT monopoly offshore.

Let's face it, H-1b is a clear example of Government picking the winners and losers in the market place.  And every US TAX PAYER is the loser, because the high US unemployment has ballooned our Federal Deficits.

Other losers include, the half of all US STEM graduates that cannot find a job in a STEM field, after five years of looking.  You want to get ripped off, go pay 100,000$ for a STEM degree, that you'll never be able to use, thanks to the H-1b Federal Government program.

The simple fact is, unemploying U.S. citizens, as an ethnic class, is an extremely profitable business model that does nothing but feed the Offshore Outsourcing business.

H-1b is desirable because an H-1b worker is indentured to the sponsoring company.  U.S. citizens are constitutionally barred from indenturing themselves.

So the disenfranchised H-1b worker will never ask for a raise, comes and goes from the United States at the will of the employer.  If the H-1b is employed by an Offshore Outsourcing company (*most are), they will never get a Green Card.

If our nation's ethnic leaders are wondering why some people of color (blacks and hispanics) are finding it hard to break into tech (blacks and hispanics are 18% of all IT grads, yet less than 9% of all IT employees), it is because ALL OF THE STARTING JOBS are taken up by H-1b trainees.

The H-1b U.S. Federal Government Program is disproportianetely affecting certain people of color in the United States, more so than Asians and Whites.  And our leaders should be railing for reform of this program, because we all know that all the great tech leaders had to start somewhere. With these positions stolen using ethnic discrimination, we can expect a smaller group of leaders from our ethnic minorities in the United States in the future.

*Most is referring only to the capped (65,000) standard H-1bs.  (Surprize, some H-1b visas are not subject to a cap, who do you think bought that amendment?)
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