3 Reasons CIOs Must Lose Hiring Perfection Goggles - InformationWeek

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IT Leadership // Enterprise Agility
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9/30/2014
09:06 AM
Tracy Cashman
Tracy Cashman
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3 Reasons CIOs Must Lose Hiring Perfection Goggles

Got open IT job slots? Holding out for Mr. or Ms. Absolutely, Completely, Utterly Right is likely to backfire. Here's how to get real and get hiring.

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BruceHarpham
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BruceHarpham,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/24/2014 | 1:49:08 PM
Growth Mindset
"Some organizations search for months or even a year to find that perfect employee. "

The search for the single "great person" is an example of the "fixed mindset" at play. That's a major limiting factor that needs to be reconsidered. Instead, I suggest emphasizing the "growth mindset": think of all those cases where people have increased their skills and knowledge over time and become more capable.

For more on this, I recommend "Mindset" by Carol Dweck.

 
TCashwoman
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TCashwoman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2014 | 3:41:24 PM
Re: "Seriously consider development"
Michael - I will have to find that NPR story. We spend a lot of time educating companies that the "purple squirrel" they think they are looking for doesn't exist!
TCashwoman
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TCashwoman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2014 | 3:38:26 PM
Re: HR a partner or roadblock?
Lorna - you are right - many HR people only know how to rely on the key word search, mainly because they often don't have the technical background to understand what they are recruiting for and key words are their fallback. While that can be a starting point, I feel they get too tied into that "checking the boxes" mentality and miss good talent.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2014 | 11:34:49 PM
"Seriously consider development"
I think this one is important. I hear about this one a lot in the Bay Area. NPR recently did a story about it. Some tech companies invest so much effort searching for the mythical "10xer," they expend more time and money than they would have if they'd  simply hired a few talented but inexperienced people and trained them-- or so went the argument, anyhow.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 12:57:51 PM
Re: Culture
Agreed - In most cases if we have a good relationship with the customer and it is a publicly posted position we usually end up ok.  We don't have issues with non competes - our clients typically don't have their employees to NCs, and, if they did, we are a vendor and not a competitor.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2014 | 12:42:02 PM
Re: Culture
Describing oaching talent from clients as "a little hairy" sounds like the understatement of the year. Do you run into issues with noncompetes? And how do you handle that politically, without losing the customer?
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2014 | 12:39:37 PM
HR a partner or roadblock?
The concept of trashing the idea of screening candidates based on a keyword search of a particular technology is smart. But I am sure many HR managers would look at you like you're nuts for suggesting such a thing. How would you suggest getting HR to understand that IT hiring is not like other roles?
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 11:36:47 AM
Re: Culture
Our best method is cherry picking the technical people we already know and respect that work on the technical side of our client base.  Granted, this can be a little hairy and has to be handled the right way as to not tick off a customer.  Otherwise, we simply give a couple of tests to candidates to screen for technical aptitude and then hold interviews with the department heads.  That second round of interviews is really to gauge the cultural fit since the aptitude part should have been achieved already.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 11:32:33 AM
Re: Culture
@progman2000 it's nice to hear that you were able to find the right culture fit. What sort of methods do you use in finding them? I think this will help the audience a lot.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 11:28:47 AM
Re: Culture
My company has always hired the personality to fit the culture.  Our software is very niche and finding someone with our needed skills is extremely difficult.  We have had better success hiring 'trainable' people from our technical customer base.
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