9 Tech Pioneers To Celebrate For Women's History Month - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // CIO Insights & Innovation
News
3/16/2016
07:06 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail

9 Tech Pioneers To Celebrate For Women's History Month

In celebration of Women's History Month, we spotlight 9 pioneers who drove transformational change in the tech industry.
3 of 10

Sister Mary Kenneth Keller
Mary Kenneth Keller was the first woman in the US to receive a PhD in computer science. She was also a member of the Catholic order Sisters of Charity, where she professed her vows in 1940.
Sister Keller's academic career brought her to DePaul University, where she earned her bachelor's degree in mathematics and, later, master's degrees in both mathematics and physics. In 1965 she earned her PhD in computer science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where she wrote a dissertation on creating algorithms to perform analytic differentiation on algebraic expression.
Following the completion of her PhD, she joined the faculty at Iowa's Clarke College. There, she founded the school's computer science department, which she chaired for 20 years. She died in 1985.
(Image: rasslava/iStockphoto)

Sister Mary Kenneth Keller

Mary Kenneth Keller was the first woman in the US to receive a PhD in computer science. She was also a member of the Catholic order Sisters of Charity, where she professed her vows in 1940.

Sister Keller's academic career brought her to DePaul University, where she earned her bachelor's degree in mathematics and, later, master's degrees in both mathematics and physics. In 1965 she earned her PhD in computer science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where she wrote a dissertation on creating algorithms to perform analytic differentiation on algebraic expression.

Following the completion of her PhD, she joined the faculty at Iowa's Clarke College. There, she founded the school's computer science department, which she chaired for 20 years. She died in 1985.

(Image: rasslava/iStockphoto)

3 of 10
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
embeetee
50%
50%
embeetee,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2016 | 11:34:34 AM
Pretty ironic picure to use for this article
The article is all about women achieving significance because of who they are, their outstanding skills, knowledge and experience...and the accompanying image is like a fashion layout for "the working girl", one knee cocked, hand on hip, blouse half unbuttoned, etc.  Very at odds with the article.
Commentary
Future IT Teams Will Include More Non-Traditional Members
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  4/1/2020
News
COVID-19: Using Data to Map Infections, Hospital Beds, and More
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  3/25/2020
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Robotic Process Automation
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  3/23/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT Careers: Tech Drives Constant Change
Advances in information technology and management concepts mean that IT professionals must update their skill sets, even their career goals on an almost yearly basis. In this IT Trend Report, experts share advice on how IT pros can keep up with this every-changing job market. Read it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll