Sports Tech Shows Internet of Things Potential - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // CIO Insights & Innovation

Sports Tech Shows Internet of Things Potential

50%
50%

With big tech players like Cisco and Intel on the bandwagon, the Internet of Things was a major theme at CES 2014. Future advances could include headphones that measure your health and cities almost smart enough to run themselves. But the present-day tech is pretty compelling, too, such as 94Fifty's $295 smart basketball, which uses embedded sensors to track how a player is performing and provide real-time feedback to a smartphone or tablet app. Check out InformationWeek's visit to 94Fifty's CES booth to learn how IoT could help tech-savvy basketball players improve their skills.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
1/27/2014 | 3:11:45 PM
Re: Goodbye tall tales
In terms of commentators, practice, analysis-- absolutely, total immersion. Some teams, such as the Houston Rockets, are already using advanced metrics to inform a lot of their coaching, and as the data becomes more adundant, people will use it for increasingly granular purposes. Mainstream media outlets like ESPN routinely dedicate coverage to new metrics that dispel old myths, and as people gain a chance to see these concepts firsthand (like they might with this product), the trend will only accelerate.


But I'm not convinced data will be used that way real-time during games, at least not soon. Like I mentioned with the track and field example, many sports governance bodies impose regulations regarding what kind of technology coaches and players can access during competition. During practice, most restrictions about technology go out the window. But during competition, many more rules come into play. That might change eventually, but I suspect the implementation of this sort tech during matches will face opposition, at least in the near term.
ChrisMurphy
50%
50%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/27/2014 | 2:40:35 PM
Re: Goodbye tall tales
My money is on it going the complete opposite direction Michael -- total immersion in data and data collection during the games. Data feeds the fanatasy sports beast, providing more fodder for discussion and debate, and it feeds the Moneyball obsession that the road to picking great players lies in having the right stats. 
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
1/27/2014 | 9:29:33 AM
Re: Goodbye tall tales
Interesting point. During games, I suspect many sports leagues will end up regulating when and how given technologies can be used. During many track and field competitions, for example, athletes are permitted almost no electronic review (photos, videos, whatever) of their performance. But tech like this will definitely change the way people talk about and practice for sports. I also wonder if it might provide educational opportunities. The app that goes alongside this basketball, for example, is a nice illustration of STEM principles in action.
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

News
Remote Work Tops SF, NYC for Most High-Paying Job Openings
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  7/20/2021
Slideshows
Blockchain Gets Real Across Industries
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  7/22/2021
Commentary
Seeking a Competitive Edge vs. Chasing Savings in the Cloud
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/19/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Monitoring Critical Cloud Workloads Report
In this report, our experts will discuss how to advance your ability to monitor critical workloads as they move about the various cloud platforms in your company.
Slideshows
Flash Poll