8 Facebook Privacy Settings To Check - InformationWeek

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IT Leadership // IT Strategy
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12/10/2014
08:40 AM
Kristin Burnham
Kristin Burnham
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8 Facebook Privacy Settings To Check

Facebook's renewed focus on privacy brought new settings and apps to the social network in 2014. Check out the settings you should review.
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1. Opt out of Facebook ad targeting.

Earlier this year, Facebook started using app and website data from your browsing habits to provide you with more targeted ads. That means if you search for a particular pair of boots online, you might see those ads pop up on Facebook, too. Facebook automatically turned on this type of advertising for all users.

To opt out on desktop, visit the Digital Advertising Alliance. This website will scan for participating companies that have enabled customized ads for your browser. You can browse your results to learn more about their advertising and privacy practices, and opt out of this advertising for all or select ones.

To opt out on your mobile device, use the controls that iOS and Android provide, Facebook advised. This includes private browsing, blocking cookies, and enabling do-not-track.

1. Opt out of Facebook ad targeting.
Earlier this year, Facebook started using app and website data from your browsing habits to provide you with more targeted ads. That means if you search for a particular pair of boots online, you might see those ads pop up on Facebook, too. Facebook automatically turned on this type of advertising for all users.

To opt out on desktop, visit the Digital Advertising Alliance. This website will scan for participating companies that have enabled customized ads for your browser. You can browse your results to learn more about their advertising and privacy practices, and opt out of this advertising for all or select ones.

To opt out on your mobile device, use the controls that iOS and Android provide, Facebook advised. This includes private browsing, blocking cookies, and enabling do-not-track.

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Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2014 | 9:55:47 AM
Re: Thanks, Kristin
One problem with apps' ToS is they can change without much notice. In some cases, you might get an email. Facebook is pretty good: They usually plaster notices all over the site warning users that a change is coming or has happened so users can -- and should -- check out the new terms to see how they affect them, what tweaks users need to make, or whether they are so intrusive that users should stop using the site all together (which has happened with some friends in the past). But I'd say, unscientifically, Facebook is the exception. When a developer uses an alternate means -- like email -- to communicate its changes, I find that a bit underhanded. It should use its own forum -- the app itself -- to widely broadcast changes so users can make informed decisions. And changes shouldn't be shrouded in legalese. As soon as I start reading a ToS that requires a law degree, I avoid that app.

For example, I used to like a shopping rewards app. Sure, I realized the app knew where I was because it gave points when I logged in to a store. But I had to proactively log in. In its second iteration, however, I waded through the legalese enough to eventually figure out the app wanted 'always on' rights -- including access to my microphone! I immediately deleted the app for obvious reasons.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/17/2014 | 9:25:03 AM
Re: Thanks, Kristin
Thanks Alison! I get many questions from readers (and friends/family as their de facto IT person) and it always strikes me how often the question "How do I know which photos are private?" still comes up. That seems to be a perennial problem, even though it's been years since they last tweaked that setting.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
12/15/2014 | 5:18:26 PM
Thanks, Kristin
I think I'm pretty savvy about Facebook but, once again, I learned something new from you, @Kristin! Thanks for another informative slideshow on social media privacy tips. Keep them coming as often as the sites change the rules! You know what I'll be up to after work (for me AND my family, as the de facto IT person).
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/15/2014 | 10:20:04 AM
Re: FB search history
@Laurianne -- only you can see your FB search history.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
12/10/2014 | 2:41:55 PM
FB search history
Who can see your FB search history? Can friends?
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