5 IT Talent, Staffing Fails To Avoid - InformationWeek
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IT Leadership // Team Building & Staffing
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8/26/2016
05:06 PM
Susan Nunziata
Susan Nunziata
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5 IT Talent, Staffing Fails To Avoid 

When InformationWeek surveyed 100 IT leaders about their greatest mistakes, talent and staffing were among the many issues we heard about. Here, we focus on five of the biggest mistakes made in this category-and offer some advice on how you can learn from the pain of your peers.
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(Image: stevanovicigor/iStockphoto)

(Image: stevanovicigor/iStockphoto)

What was the biggest mistake your IT organization made in the past 12 months?

That's the question InformationWeek posed to 100 IT leaders in the US earlier this year. It provided us with an inside view into the litany of woes facing IT professionals. These range from complications caused by vendors behaving badly to overcoming deeply entrenched business culture obstacles.

Talent and staffing mistakes were among the issues we heard about, and we'll focus on five of the biggest mistakes made in this category -- and offer some advice on how you can learn from the pain of your peers.

First, here's some more information about the survey. Every year, InformationWeek releases the Elite 100 -- a ranking of the nation's most innovative users of business technology. As part of the process, we also conduct the annual InformationWeek Elite 100 Executive Research Survey, which offers a unique glimpse into the strategies of these 100 large, leading-edge IT organizations.

[ Don't do it like this. Read 8 Ways To Fail At DevOps.]

The survey, which is open only to Elite 100 applicants, polled US-based companies and higher education institutions that have $250 million or more in revenue. Subsidiaries with revenues below $250 million may apply for the Elite 100 if their parent company has qualifying revenue and their parent company did not apply. Federal, state, county, and local or municipal US agencies are also eligible to apply.

All survey results are submitted on the condition of anonymity. While the mistakes we're highlighting here were submitted by survey respondents, we are omitting the names of companies and executives in order to protect the innocent (and guilty, as the case may be).

Once you've reviewed these five mistakes, tell us what you think. Are these lapses in judgment in line with your own experiences? Are there other talent and staffing mistakes you regret? How would you recommend fixing some of these errors? Tell us all about it in the comments section below.

Susan Nunziata leads the site's content team and contributors to guide topics, direct strategies, and pursue new ideas, all in the interest of sharing practicable insights with our community.Nunziata was most recently Director of Editorial for EnterpriseEfficiency.com, a UBM ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
8/31/2016 | 4:00:20 AM
Re: When the candidates are not the problem
Exactly, Joe. It's one of those things everybody knows but no one likes to talk about. Some hiring managers think that making the process long, exhausting, and hard maybe gives more ccredibility to the company and reflects the importance of the position. They are wrong. Then there are the complains about "there is no talent," which is not really true. -Susan
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/30/2016 | 10:11:10 PM
Re: When the candidates are not the problem
Indeed, Susan.  For all the talk about how much a "bad hire" costs, what about the cost of a bad, slow, inefficient hiring process?  Or the cost of leaving a position unfilled for too long?

Or even the cost of a "mediocre hire" to save a few bucks on process when a better process costing a bit more time and money could lead to a stellar hire?

But nobody likes to talk about that.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
8/30/2016 | 6:55:12 PM
When the candidates are not the problem
I think there are two things many companies fail: Bering ready to invest in talent and making the process of hiring as stressful, difficult, and tricky as they can. The end result not always reflects success. Perhaps it's about time they changed something? -Susan
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