8 Hot Tech Jobs Getting Big Salary Bumps In 2016 - InformationWeek

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IT Leadership // Team Building & Staffing
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11/23/2015
07:05 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
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8 Hot Tech Jobs Getting Big Salary Bumps In 2016

Engineering jobs to mobile app developer positions are expected to post some of the largest salary gains in 2016, and some tech-related creative careers are not too far behind. Here's a look at eight of those hot jobs.
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(Image: Tax Credits via Flicker Creative Commons)

(Image: Tax Credits via Flicker Creative Commons)

Although the nation's professional workforce is expected to post an average of a 4.1% base pay increase in 2016, technology workers overall are expected to fare better with a 5.3% increase. Thanks to an increasing focus on digital strategy among businesses, several "creative" positions are set to cash in as well, according to the 2016 Salary Guide from staffing firm Robert Half Technology and The Creative Group.

Wireless network engineers in particular will be rolling in the dough, with an anticipated base pay increase approaching double-digit growth next year. Meanwhile, creative jobs like multimedia designers and content strategists are expected to post higher gains than the overall national bump and the tech sector.

"Companies continue to struggle to find professionals who can help create seamless digital experiences -- from collecting and analyzing customer data, to building secure e-commerce environments to providing intuitive, easy-to-navigate websites," said John Reed, senior executive director of Robert Half Technology and The Creative Group, in a statement.

The recently released salary guide forecasts compensation trends across a wide array of technology positions based on data from thousands of interim and full-time job placements each year, as well as surveys of 2,400-2,500 CIOs and other IT professionals conducted by Robert Half.

In the race to fill vacant positions with high-caliber talent, some companies -- including Fortune 500 players -- have resorted to offering unlimited vacation time and generous perks on the company campus like free gourmet meals, to massages, to more unusual benefits like office decorating budgets and helicopter rides.

[See 10 Skills CIOs Need To Survive, Thrive In 2016.]

Recruiting techniques have also undergone some changes as companies seek to get an edge when wooing technology and creative workers. Some of the techniques include providing the latest and coolest tools for workers to use and providing opportunities to work on exciting projects. Other recruiting techniques include offering opportunities for professional development and for working remotely.

With a combination of lavish perks and above-market pay, companies are aiming to hook potential employees for their engineering and big data positions, as well as their creative slots, according to Robert Half Technology. The staffing firm has found that highly skilled and experienced IT workers frequently receive multiple job offers, even when they aren't pounding the pavement looking for work.

This environment helps explain some of the salary pops in these eight careers. Is your job on the list? Even if it isn't, are you expecting to see a jump in your pay next year? Tell us why or why not in the comments section below.

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

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SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2015 | 11:55:30 PM
Re: Big data
It's nice to see non engineering fields getting recognition as well. I think the UX should work in tandem with the Multimedia designer and the UI designer. I used to think if someone can do UI then someone can do Multimedia as well. Seems like I was wrong, but you know what? It's good that companies are separating common domains to find a little specialization in the form of a new job!
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
11/24/2015 | 5:52:25 PM
Credentials for a big data job are.....
I asked IBM how it could turn out a million data scientists and VP Rob Thomas said by getting them to build their first data analytics application. He was overseeing the Datapalooza in San Francisco that expected to turn out 240 data scientists in three days. Another 300,000 have gone through IBM's massive open online course. So let's say the credentials for big data jobs are loosely established. 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/24/2015 | 8:56:18 AM
Re: Big data
So, how do we know when these jobs become mainstream or become positions that have a standard skillset associated with them that is transferrable across markets and companies.  It's great that they are going to see a bump in salary but if you can't find a job doing this then what?  It's not a made up position but it is a new push for these skills so I'm not surprised that a pay adjustment is in order. 
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
11/23/2015 | 1:13:35 PM
Re: Big data
Specially for data scientist, most such individuals get their experience on the job; the accreditation for such areas still vey hazy.  I think  the transition into such roles are challenging for those whom want to get into them.   I would like to know whether people from other fields have been able to make their transition to these jobs.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/23/2015 | 8:25:31 AM
Big data
The Big Data Engineer and Data scientist roles don't really surprise me but I wonder what the actual market for them is.  I don't see a lot of demand for them in the SMB space but the roles are filled by a more generalized analyst position.  Once you into very large companies do you need a dozen Data Engineers?
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