Top 10 Highest Paying Tech Companies - InformationWeek

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5/11/2016
07:06 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
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Top 10 Highest Paying Tech Companies

Looking to work for a tech company that offers a lucrative salary? Here's a cheat sheet based on Glassdoor's list of the highest paying US tech companies in 2016.
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(Image: stephenbayer via Pixabay)

(Image: stephenbayer via Pixabay)

Six-figure salaries are the norm when it comes to the top 10 tech companies that offer the highest pay in 2016, according to a recent survey from jobs and recruiting site Glassdoor. 

The median base pay at these tech companies ranged from $123,331 to as much as $140,000, according to Glassdoor. But when bonuses and other forms of compensation are factored into the mix, the median total compensation ranged from $149,000 to $157,000.

"In technology, we continue to see unprecedented salaries as the war for talent is still very active, largely due to the ongoing shortage of highly skilled workers needed," said Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor chief economist, in a statement.

[See 8 Cheat Sheet Sites to Ace Tech Job Interviews.]

At tech companies, the majority of high salaries tend to be found in deep tech roles, such as product manager, software engineer, and other deep tech roles, Glassdoor noted.

Among the top 10 tech companies that shell out the highest median salaries there are some surprises, Jessica Jaffe, a Glassdoor community expert, told InformationWeek.

"While big names such as Google, Twitter, and Facebook are no surprise on this list, it's always interesting to see which lesser known companies can stack up. Companies like Cadence Design Systems and VMware may not be the first ones that spring to mind when researching the highest paying companies. However, these companies are in a competitive industry (tech) where a high salary is an essential recruiting and retention tool."

The list of tech companies is part of Glassdoor's larger survey of the 25 companies from all industries that pay the highest salaries. Of this larger pool, 19 companies are in the San Francisco and New York areas, which may, in part, explain the need for higher salaries given the cost of living in those markets, Jaffe noted.

Over the past few years, starting salaries and total compensation for tech talent has mostly been trending upward, John Reed, senior executive director for recruiting firm Robert Half Technology told InformationWeek in an interview.

"Hiring managers are changing their recruiting strategies," Reed said. "They're willing to offer sign-on bonuses, annual bonuses and other perks in order to attract and retain top talent for their organizations."

The average starting salaries across all roles and industries are $94,000 to $138,320, according to the 2016 Robert Half Technology Salary Guide.

Industries paying top dollar for their tech teams right now include the technology, financial, and healthcare sectors. "Those with the technical and specific industry experience have the potential to see higher than average salaries and benefits," Reed said.

The Glassdoor figures were culled from salary reports submitted by current and former employees of US-based companies, and provided voluntarily and anonymously. These entries included base pay and other forms of compensation such as bonuses, tips, commissions and other forms of compensation that Glassdoor users posted to the site between March 30, 2015, and March 29, 2016.

Take a look at these top 10 tech companies, their median total compensation, and median base pay. Specific occupations and the average annual salary are included for each of the 10 tech companies, based on the salary posts to the Glassdoor site as of this publishing. (The averages fluctuate as additional employees post their salary to the site.) Tell us how your company stacks up.

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

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jhr4719
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jhr4719,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/19/2016 | 11:49:31 AM
Re: Cost of living
Cost of living is one thing and clealy not taken into consideratin in this survey.  These are also IT jobs not developer, senior engneers, etc. Lumping everything related to technology into a single category means they should alsoincude marketing, sales, accounting, etc.  Studies can twist data into any format they choose. The only way to do an apples to apples comparison is with a job decription, cost of living, and quality of life factor. 
Vision33r
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Vision33r,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2016 | 10:03:25 AM
Re: Cost of living
Today companies are very mobile, they move to wherever they get lower tax deals.  That's how businesses can move to many high tax states and still pay less tax.  The whole point is this translate to high paying jobs paying higher income taxes.

Many companies are busy outsourcing and hiring remote workers and pay the market rate salary for a remote worker which is usually 20-40% below a local FT worker.  

Companies will do whatever it takes to pay less for everything.

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
5/13/2016 | 9:42:18 AM
Re: ideal housing expense (rent/mortgage) is 20%-25% of gross, up to 30% max
@cEricL: I can assure you that it's not much better in Boston.

Meanwhile, those who live outside of the northeast and outside of LA and the Bay Area are completely baffled that we're willing to pay this much money.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
5/12/2016 | 12:24:35 PM
Re: Cost of living
@Joe - hahahaha touche' but you see how that doesn't make sense for the company to promote that - it should be a premium they should be more than willing to pay to keep the business up and running.
cEricL
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cEricL,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/12/2016 | 11:26:26 AM
ideal housing expense (rent/mortgage) is 20%-25% of gross, up to 30% max
If you want a 1.5+ bathroom home (apartment or house) within a 2 hour commute of these companies (2 hours?!?!?!), you're lucky if you are paying under $3,000 per month. 

...still screwed. ;)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
5/12/2016 | 8:47:29 AM
Re: Cost of living
@vnewman2:

> When something goes wrong, just guess who is the only one who can do something about it day or night?  The person who lives 2 hours away?  Uh - no.

Another benefit to living in the cheaper suburbs!  ;)
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
5/11/2016 | 5:13:55 PM
Re: Cost of living
I think so @jastroff - for those companies who say they gather salary data, the problem is they use aggregate numbers covering areas are too economically diverse (yet close geographically) that they fail to create an accurate depiction.  
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
5/11/2016 | 4:31:40 PM
Re: Cost of living
It's odd that in this "day and age" a company doesn't adjust for cost of living re: geography when it decides salaries, etc?
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
5/11/2016 | 2:46:22 PM
Re: Cost of living
@Joe - How is it that the relativity of salary or wages are still completely ignored like this?

I live in Southern California, my company is headquartered in Missouri - guess who sets budget for salaries?  People who haven't a clue about the reality of the difference in cost of living.

Everything is relative.  The problem is people hear a "big" number and it sounds like a lot of money.  But what matters is what you get to keep.

I live 5 minutes away from my work - I hate it when people say things like, well you could move where it is more affordable.  Why?   If a company can "afford" to live there, they should be willing to compensate their workers enough to "live" there as well.   I work with people who drive 2+ hours to get here - to me, that's insane.  Companies should WANT you live there them - especially in IT.  When something goes wrong, just guess who is the only one who can do something about it day or night?  The person who lives 2 hours away?  Uh - no.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
5/11/2016 | 9:04:33 AM
Cost of living
What's missing from this analysis is that these are all Bay-Area cities -- and, as such, to live and work at any of those HQs (Wal-Mart eCommerce, even -- which, unlike its parent in Bentonville, AR, is located in San Bruno, CA) you've got one of the highest costs of living in the country.

I wonder what a top-ten would look like adjusted for cost of living.  I'm betting we'd see companies like Dell and possibly a few genuine surprises up there.
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