Comments
ICD-10: Painful To Implement, Painful To Delay
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/31/2014 | 4:06:54 PM
Re: ICD10 delay
Maybe the approach the Cleveland Clinic CIO suggests really is the best - let the big organizations move forward with ICD-10 even if others aren't ready - and government and insurers should figure out a way to let that happen.

On the other hand, it sounds like some docs will never be ready. Don't you trust Athenahealth or some other EHR / practice management vendor to smooth out the rough edges for you?
LewisL957
50%
50%
LewisL957,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 3:33:54 PM
What's in it for Me?
ICD-10 is "granular."  It lets researchers, insurance companies, the feds, and anyone else who gets their eyes on the data do great things.  This data is valuable.  To get this data, I, a solo practitioner, must buy software, recode the diagnosis for every patient, code it again the next visit as the specificity has changed, and so on. 

 

And what am I paid for providing this valuable data?  Why, nothing at all!  In fact, if the computer at the other end doesn't like my code, I don't get paid for my work.  And the payments here in primary care land are, shall we say, inadequate for the work we do, let alone for the data processing services we are required to provide for free in order to get our pay.

 

I say it's spinach, and I say the heck with it.
cdavant3
50%
50%
cdavant3,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 2:12:35 PM
ICD10 delay
Sorry folks, but I'm one of hundreds of over 65 Family Docs in private practice who are planning to close our practices 9/30/14 if ICD10 isn't delayed. It's going to cost tens of thousands to convert and there will be zero return on that investment. Most of us are living hand to mouth paying our help now and the advice to "have six months revenue in reserve" or "open a line of credit" isn't realistic. It makes perfect sense to use ICD10 at the hospital level and a much more limited set at the office. If you think there is any clinical benefit in letting an insurance carrier know if a kid has a left or right ear infection or if you hit your head walking into a lamppost you have major problems.
<<   <   Page 2 / 2


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.