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Samsung Researchers Celebrate Promising Graphene Breakthrough
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danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
4/5/2014 | 2:45:08 PM
Tough
Using tougher materials for devices is important. How often, for example, have we seen a cracked screen? Here's hoping that graphene can help reinforce the strangth of mobile devices.

I believe that mobile will be the biggest benefactor in this.

But one thing to think about is the fact that this may make phones more expensive because of added material costs.

We often talk about a future with throwaway devices. But with these types of materials, I wonder if that will happen at the upper end of smart devices. 
Paul987
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Paul987,
User Rank: Strategist
4/5/2014 | 6:20:38 PM
Re: Tough
"I believe that mobile will be the biggest benefactor in this"

Dude, you should really read up on graphene if you think the biggest benefactor will be smartphones for crying out loud.  Graphene has huge potential for a wide range of uses, from medecine to energy production and storage to thermal management to name just a few.  

People really need to get over this obsession with smartphones.  There's a whole world beyond that little 5 inch screen.  


anon2880817580
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anon2880817580,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2014 | 7:55:29 PM
Let's see Apple sue over graphene...
Samsung pursues cutting-edge research that may change the world. 

Meanwhile, Apple sues Samsung over the ability to tap on a phone number in a text message and have it show up in the dialer.


I ask you: who is the innovator?
Utsalady
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Utsalady,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2014 | 9:24:25 PM
Biggest uses will be transportation, construction
Agree with Paul987, mobile is an area that might gain some minor advantage, but other areas are far greater. I see huge applications in areas like transportation: cars that are much lighter, yet much  stronger and safer, electric vehicles that can run much further on a battery, aircraft with greater fuel economy. Hey, even stronger but lighter bicycles if the stuff isn't too expensive.

Space exploration, where every gram of weight put into orbit takes about $20 in fuel (that's $20K per kilogram), is a prime area: The potentially higher cost of working with a material like graphene might be recovered entirely from fuel savings. We're talking about satellites that cost $200 million to build so they're not going to quibble about the high cost of a graphene part; cutting 100 kilograms of weight out of the satellite could cut launch costs by $2 million or more, particularly for high-orbit launches.

Imagine stronger bridges, stronger office buildings.  

 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
4/5/2014 | 9:26:10 PM
Re: Tough
@Paul
I agree, and I was thinking the same thing as I read the article. Not too surprising, when you consider that half the people in any given public space have their faces buried into smartphone screens :-) I came across an article that mentioned that if dopants can be introduced into graphene, it might be the next candidate material for building IC's. If wonder what the characteristic will be. Speed? Resistance to radiation?  And, depending on who you ask, graphene is 200 to 5000 times stronger than steel - the imagination is really the limit here!
James212
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James212,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/6/2014 | 1:30:31 PM
Re: Tough
With this, Samsung will increase it's quality and durability.

 

http://etechnologytips.com
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
4/7/2014 | 8:48:32 AM
Re: Biggest uses will be transportation, construction
Even if it is a consumer product that brings graphene to the market that is still a good thing.  Someone has to be the company that puts the money and effort into pushing technology.  You're right though that it has many more potential uses and I think that if we see the cost of manufacturing come down because it becomes popular in consumer electronics then we're better off for it.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2014 | 4:32:39 PM
Re: Tough
Imagination is one limit. Adapting legacy manufacturing systems is another. Unfortunately, we will have to wait for core industrial processes to catch up to allow graphene to be produced at scale and in a manner that works with current manufacturing infrastructure. But graphene undoubtedly is pretty amazing stuff. 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
4/7/2014 | 5:02:39 PM
Re: Tough
Remember "Buckyballs" from a decade or so ago? Now that manufacturers with DEEP Pockets are starting to get interested in this amazing nano-technology, it may finally migrate out of physics labs and onto the agendas of all sorts of engineers.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2014 | 5:40:52 PM
Re: Tough
It was a travesty when BuckyBalls were banned.
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