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Google CEO: Fight Unemployment With Job Sharing
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hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/15/2014 | 12:46:39 PM
Ironic
Isn't it ironic? Google CEO grabbed more power and money. Google Shareholders have little or no power at all. If you were owned 90% Google shares you can't take your shares to Google and do anything with it.

How about google CEO share his jobs and take 50% less bonuses?
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/14/2014 | 6:55:36 AM
Re: Yeah Sue...
Agreed, educational institutions at both sides of the spectrum, i.e. public and private, should take a lead role in providing students will the skillsets that will be in demand after their 4 year degrees, etc. It is a difficult task, considering the current state of technological progression -- it would be difficult to predict the services that would be in demand 4 years from now. However, if the institutions implement techniques from big data, etc., I feel that the challenge can be met. 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/13/2014 | 11:55:03 PM
Re: Yeah Sue...
I sometimes watch Bloomberg business late at night, when the British TV journalists on the air. When they discuss business pay, it seems that European CEO's with responsibility equal to their American counterparts make maybe 10% as much.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/13/2014 | 11:51:05 PM
Re: Yeah Sue...
Unfortunately, planned obsolesence makes that impossible. There was Absolutely NOTHING wrong with my old XP computer - other than the fact that Microsoft stopped supporting the OS. There's even planned obsolescece in men's clothing. Working at home, I almost never have to wear a suit. A few months ago, I did. When my sister saw my suit, she broke out laughing and told me I'd be hooted out of the room if I showed up with lapels that size.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Strategist
7/13/2014 | 7:21:28 PM
Re: Yeah Sue...
I think companies will always try to find a way to reduce cost and decrease the number of employees needed for a task.  In these cases, rather than automate, government should work with schools to provide young people with the skills needed to survive in this new job market where new jobs are created.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Strategist
7/12/2014 | 3:21:42 AM
Sharing not for the young

While job sharing may be an option to combat unemployment and underemployment -it may be best suited to more established workers who have a better financial base and need flexible hours to meet demands in their private lives. For younger workers who honestly need the experience and the income it's really not the solution. Our younger generations are saddled with more education debt earlier in life and need full time incomes to be able to move forward with their lives and support our overall economy. The work share issue also doesn't address worker benefits-- this would create a large portion of uninsured workers.

mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 6:41:28 PM
leisure time
"In the future, we will work less and enjoy more leisure time, while being shuttled around in self-driving cars, attended by artificial intelligence that makes better decisions than we do"
 
I wonder if leisure time for Mr Page is similar to the leisure time that Mr Hayes was enjoying when he died for a heroin overdose on his yacht.
In any case, like someone mentioned below. unless we have 2 jobs, the job sharing won't work.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2014 | 3:51:44 PM
Re: Disconnected...
Actually, this is the same empty argument that is being put out about the $15 minimum wage. if you double the salaries and halve the work, then the cost and price of everything will necessarily go up. Therefore, the "working poor" will still be working poor - but now they have to pay $4 for a hamburger instead of $1 hamburger. All you do is move the scale without effecting any real change and you end up hurting the ones you meant to help.

The other thing the authors ignore is the fact that there are PLENTY of things that people want to buy, not that they need. They probably read some academic (and very flawed) study of how "rich people don't really feel better about things" that was published for social engineering purposes. An overwhelming majority of people ALWAYS want shiny things, especially ones that they don't NEED to survive.
wnsrfr
IW Pick
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wnsrfr,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2014 | 11:28:11 AM
All you that are hating on this present no alternatives
I've read Lights in the Tunnel and many other books like it.

In 1977 an art professor of mine and Vermont philosopher that I highly respected suggested job sharing as something in our future--always remembered that.

There are obvious challenges, most highly our competitive nature that makes reduced hours a difficult proposition along with the need to maintain free market effectiveness.

But the "free market" still operates within many rules and boundaries today...our future challenge is to find a way to reduce hours (to facilitate job sharing) while maintaining income levels and encouraging competition and success.

One piece of the puzzle may be to tax automation much like value added taxes are employed in other countries.  But the tax will not go to the government but will be earmarked to all employees of the company taxed. 

Another piece--recognizing the value of job sharing on a social level.  Sure, pie in the sky, but it has worked to increase our recycling rates and over time being someone that participates in job sharing may be the new cool.

Something is needed.  Classic economic theory that automation just shifts jobs to new opportunities is like the frog in the pot at minute 5..."the water got warmer earlier, and no harm resulted, so no harm will occur in the future!"
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 10:52:52 AM
Removed
As trend setting as a lot of the businesses these guys head are, the problem of being so far removed from everyday financial worries is that you simply cannot appreciate the day to day hardships of people that aren't in your bubble. 

As idealistic as the idea of having more time off and onyl working part time, as the article points out, unless we're suddenly earning a lot more per hour than before, I don't see how it could ever work. 
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