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Are Macs Taking Over the Enterprise?
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cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 2:44:52 PM
Re: Take over?
@Gary_EL I don't disagree with you about the irritation over planned obsolesence, but you don't have to abandon an OS just because Microsoft is. Lots of companies are paying for extended support to keep XP alive in their enterprise because that's still cheaper than a full-scale migration to an OS they don't really urgently need. 

Personally, while I find Windows 7 to be an improvement from a stability and networking standpoint over XP, I see absolutely no compelling reason to adopt Windows 8. And most people feel the same way, which is why there's suddenly a rush of stories about Windows 9 development. 

I said many times over on E2 that few companies other than MSFT can afford to fail as much as it has. 
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 2:41:24 PM
Re: Take over?
@melgross While it might be possible that Macs are less expensive to maintain, there's no way to really know that because Macs have nowhere near the enterprise penetration of PCs. So any study, even if it's well intentioned, is going to be skewed one way or another. When there's any growth in Mac penetration, the percentage gain is going to look huge, but overall the actual percentage deployed across an enterprise will remain small. 

My work is concentrated mainly in financial services, so I haven't had the experience of working across a broad set of industries. But I've yet to even see a Mac in any company for which I've consulted in the last five years outside of the creative services or marketing functions. 
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 2:37:13 PM
Re: Take over?
@Technocrati Windows 8.1 quite simply isn't really a factor in the enterprise. I'm currently consulting for one of the largest insurers in the world and it hasn't even completed migration to Windows 7 yet and isn't set to do so until late this year. 

And while they may be late to the Windows 7 bandwagon, large enterprises are generally one OS cycle behind. 

I'd be hard pressed to be convinced that Macs are invading any enterprise, with the exception of a relatively limited number of folks in creative roles. Macs are quite simply something you just don't see in large corporate environments, as a rule. 
Charlie Babcock
IW Pick
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 2:16:59 PM
If Microsoft is getting weaker on the deskto, what's not to like--VMware
Nice analysis here by Michael. VMware as the sponsor of this survey is trying to get the survey to perform a balancing act. Give the end users what they want, which seems to be Macs and Macbooks. But put virtual desktop infrastructure on them so that they can access their existing Windows and Office applications and Windows servers. Weaken Microsoft as a desktop vendor, strengthen VMware as a virtualization vendor. Not bad for one survey. 
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 2:04:51 PM
Re: Take over?
"Over 70% of respondents said employees perceive Macs as easier to use than Windows PCs."

Wow, that's high. Macs are definitely prettier and they pass the cool test, but I disagree that they're easier to use. Windows UI is arguably more intuitive than a Mac. But the problem is not the UI, it's that Windows is loaded down with too many updates, and AV software, and has not caught on with young people because it never made any headway in mobile. Add to that Macs coming in the back door through BYOD as more millennials join the workforce, and you can see this situation not getting better for Microsoft.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 1:36:51 PM
Re: Take over?
@Henrisha    I think a lot of companies are not too impressed with Window 8.1 and this view is probably the biggest reason Macs are invading the enterprise.    So I agree it will be interesting to see how MS responds to this real threat to it's enterprise market share.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 1:31:54 PM
Re: Take over?
@soozyg    I don't think it is due solely to iPhones and iPads.  Many companies are using the mac mini as a desktop or backend server.
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2014 | 1:27:29 PM
Re: Take over?
I would think that iPhones and iPads make up a huge bulk of that. Will be interesting to see how other platforms respond, specially Windows.
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2014 | 1:26:58 PM
Re: Take over?
I'm a little surprised at that number/percentage. I was always under the impression that most offices only have Windows support, so this is a bit of good news. Shows inter-platform support and makes the job for many people easier.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 1:19:01 PM
Re: Take over?
Many younger folks' first computer experience is smartphone devices, almost none of which are Windows-based. There is also the continuing disgust over Microsoft's planned obsolescence, forcing users to abandon perfectly good XP machines for 7 machines that do nothing new for them. If they pull the same thing with 7, forcing their users to adopt Window 8, 8.1, or the upcoming Windows 9, anything can happen. Microsoft is poisoning its own waters.
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