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How To Be An Office Hero: 3 Myths, Busted
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freespiritny25
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freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 5:47:36 PM
Re: Inexpensive perk
@ Lorna, I totally agree with you about how annual reviews can be skewed by the hero. I used to get frustrated by a boss that wanted all annual reviews done three months before the due date. It was senseless to me.
freespiritny25
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freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 5:44:53 PM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
Sometimes burning the midnight oil to get something done early may give your boss the illusion that certain tasks actually take a lot less time than they originally thought. Then they may set deadlines for future assignments a lot earlier than they normally would have or may give you more projects to do, since they think that you have more time than you really do have.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 4:06:05 PM
Re: Inexpensive perk
Frequent short reviews also lessen the possibility that an annual review will be skewed by whether someone was a hero (or dropped the ball) just prior to the review. 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 4:03:53 PM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
I have a writer (who shall remain nameless) who asks me to set a copy deadline two weeks before I actually need it. Now, to me, that's like setting your bedside clock ahead 20 minutes to trick yourself into getting up on time. You know you're lying to yourself. And yet, for some people, it works.
Bhori
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Bhori,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 2:45:51 PM
Re: Inexpensive perk
@ David: I agree that annual reviews are annoying. That is why they should break up into monthly reviews which would be simple, not as thorough as annual review. This way performance of the whole year can be reviewed rather than only recent events in case of annual review.  Since, the organization is already reviewing the financial performance on monthly basis; there is a sense to review the performance of those contributing to financial results often.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 2:00:07 PM
Re: How to Be An Office Hero
@zerox203- Fair enough. Though usually people are told the study is about somehting else so as to not influence the rreaction. For instance, the people doing the ticket test could have been told they were testing different website configurations, the habits of concertgoers, or other issues. The same with the mock negotiations. they could have been told during the negotiation that the team was monitoring body language or whatever. There are ways to make the people self-conscious about something else so they aren't self-conscious about the thing you are testing.

I'll go back and see if I can figure out what the "control" was in these cases.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 1:43:47 PM
Re: How to Be An Office Hero
Good article and good points, but I'm not sure how I feel about the research mentioned for the first two points (the third one I'll gladly agree with, as I feel like I've experienced it firsthand... but maybe that's selection bias). If people know they're part of a study, they're bound to answer differently than they would in a real-world situation. The people in the concert ticket study probably just wanted the tickets and filled out the survey in a hurry ("Yeah, I said row 10 and it's row 8, 3 stars, whatever") - or if there wasn't really a concert involved, we have the same problem. It depends too much on trusting people to answer honestly and carefully than something objective.

In the second study, if people were aware they were being watched, they might have acted more timidly because they felt more anxious, or overracted on the agression to ham it up - because they knew their real job wasn't on the line. Likewise, the reviewers might have been more inclined to answer towards some perceived ideal of the 'assertive negotiator' rather than about what they would have liked to deal with in a real work setting. For example, if you've been selling X product for five or ten years, you get an idea of what the negotiations go like and what kind of clients you get that you can't replicate in a study. I still agree with the points, but I think this is an area where we're better going on common sense than research results.

Also, I'm glad someone mentioned the scene with Scotty and Geordi as a response to the Scotty comment and this topic in general. That's one of my favorite scenes of all time. Here's the full clip.
MultiHats
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MultiHats,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 1:29:17 PM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
Actually, I agree that estimates should be as accurate as possible. However, I also believe adding a little padding to compensate for the unexpected complication or interruption is reasonable. The ability to accurately estimate time/effort required and culture also play a role. Some do a better job at estimating time/effort required than others. If one tends to underestimate, adding a little padding just evens things out. If one tends to overestimate, then adding padding is a no-no. In some work cultures, it is better to add a week to the estimate that to take a day longer than the original estimate.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 11:58:01 AM
Re: Inexpensive perk
@Bhori- As much as I get the concept, I find one annual review for just myself annoying. If I had to do a 360 review for my entire team every month, I think I'd fail to get a lot of stuff done. Is there a way to shorten that process? And what do we gain out of that much reviewing?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 11:55:26 AM
Re: No more Mr. Scott
@SaneIT- Agreed. What happened to just making promises and delivering what you promise? That seems good enough for 90% of the things in this world.
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