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HP Warns Of IoT Security Risks
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BrianRay
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BrianRay,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/7/2014 | 9:04:07 AM
Security from the start
I think the real key is designing security in from the very beginning. http://www.link-labs.com/blog/the-2-hows-of-iot-security
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
8/3/2014 | 12:38:14 AM
Re: Maybe we should rename it the Insecurity of Things
Could not agree more... as everyone want it now... but tend to forget about security... or hide the problem...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
8/3/2014 | 12:36:00 AM
Re: Ah, we've seen this movie before
this days Co. try to spend less but get more... or pretend they getting more... paying at the end with security holes...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
8/3/2014 | 12:34:51 AM
Re: Ah, we've seen this movie before
same here in Canada we do have same problem with Target.... we are in the same boat :)
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
8/3/2014 | 12:33:58 AM
Re: Ah, we've seen this movie before
yes, it like arm race, during Cold War... as this days nothing is secure...
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 4:43:00 PM
Re: Ah, we've seen this movie before
Drew,

Very,Very True![And I am sure Informationweek also agrees].

The big issue is why don't the Manufacturers spend more Secure Coding Best Practices and related issues?

Its not that difficult-It costs time and Money.

And when everyone is simply engaged in an Arms Race to push Solutions out faster than the next ,These "Minor" things can be overlooked.

Here's some clear-cut Research even the Security Firms are failing at the job they are supposed do-Decisively.

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2459761/antivirus-products-riddled-with-security-flaws-researcher-says.html

Regards

Ashish.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 1:08:38 PM
Re: ah, we’ve seen this before
If you are still using IoT then I guess you have yourself to blame because I am very sure that something bad is going to happen to you. This has been said like a million times and I just don't have better words to warn you. Thank you for this great article.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 5:31:40 PM
Re: Ah, we've seen this movie before
Drew, exactly right -- and I was already frustrated by Target :)
Drew Conry-Murray
IW Pick
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 5:17:10 PM
Re: Ah, we've seen this movie before
That's what's so frustrating! We can guarantee that IoT devices will be hackable, and we have the recent history of the Web to demonstrate that people can and will find vulnerabilities and create exploits, whether for the lulz, vandalism, or to commit crime. We know it's going to happen, and yet still we have to go through the whole stupid dance.

The first time someone gets hurt or ripped off by an IoT vuln and the manufacturer says "I had no idea!" I propose that the CEO has to have the words "I'm a jackass" tatooed to his or her head.
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:22:26 PM
Re: Maybe we should rename it the Insecurity of Things
In the consumer industry, I'd say no one at this point because most of the outcomes of a hacked IoT device aren't that severe.The problem is, when security gets added on later once real problems arise, it means systems are less safe than if security had been built in from the start.

We might see more consumer-oriented action if the automotive industry gets deeply into IoT, i.e. as the car becomes more of a mobile hotspot and has apps that connect to third-party devices and systems, like reporting on your driving behavior to your insurance company, or ordering and paying in advance for a meal on at a turnpike rest stop. Once you add payments to the IoT mix, you get the security incentive.

However, I'd say medical device manufacturers and the healthcare industry have a significant stake in driving IoT security standards, if only for liability issues. Same for the use of IoT in industrial controls and manufacturing.
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