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Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
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ANON1245867443530
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ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/5/2012 | 11:14:01 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Exactly. It's the pathetic, lazy dereliction of design duty. How many more apologists do we need to hear floating this strawman: "Who cares if the Start menu sucks? Just search for the program you want to use."

So now we're supposed to remember the name of every application on our computers and TYPE them in to run them? You know what that's called?

THE COMMAND LINE. That's not a GUI.
ANON1245867443530
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ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/5/2012 | 11:11:16 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Long-running? Microsoft advanced the state of GUIs more throughout the '90s than anyone else, easily eclipsing moribund Apple. While Microsoft has clearly lost its way (along with its design talent), this problem has only degraded the Windows experience since Vista.
ANON1245867443530
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ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/5/2012 | 11:08:59 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
"where Apple seems to know what you want before you do"

Ugh, same old fawning. This is a crock, which any look at Lion will tell you. Both Apple and Microsoft are regressing at an alarming rate, forgetting basic UI design principles that have made computers accessible to everyone. Great example: Hiding UI controls until the user accidentally rolls the cursor over them. The sheer stupidity of this tactic reveals the fraud of Apple's "elegance" and the sorry decline of Microsoft's once-efficient and standard-setting UIs.
ANON1245867443530
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ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/5/2012 | 11:05:08 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
The program organization in Windows has steadily gotten worse since the advent of the Start menu, which violates Microsoft's own UI guidelines for cascading menus (they shouldn't be more than three deep).

The old Program Manager groups on the desktop (before Windows 95) were, by far, the most efficient organization of applications.

The mess got even worse after XP, when it became impossible to organize your applications into groups that cascaded from the Start menu. And software vendors now litter the Start menu with crap without permission, not bothering to ask WHERE you want the shortcuts to go. Who organizes their applications by PUBLISHER? Heaven forbid you want all your graphics apps, audio apps, general-office apps, or utilities in separate groups.
ANON1245867443530
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ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/5/2012 | 11:00:29 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
What a lame assertion, that he's biased because he happens to now work with a company that happens to have some overlap with SOME of Microsoft's business.

If he thinks Windows 8's UI will fail and he wants that to be true, then he would have no interest in providing free advice.

Think it through.
Prshnt_khnl
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Prshnt_khnl,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/1/2012 | 7:45:54 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
I own a Lenovo G460 and I faced a problem on my Wi-Fi. Everytime I put my device on hibernate mode and when I start it later the network connection showed limited availability and I had to restart it everytime. After sometime the network did not even connect and what life is it without an internet.

So, unless they resolve this matter I ain't gonna switch to Windows 8 Consumer Preview
YMOM100
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YMOM100,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/18/2012 | 11:57:58 AM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Interestingly, that site no longer works. Did Microsoft send the lawyers to break some bones and servers?
YMOM100
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YMOM100,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/17/2012 | 3:29:40 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Maybe...but on the traditional desktop with the much smaller icons there was no need to scroll around (despite it being possible under specific circumstances). The majority of tiles in Metro are not live tiles, so having them use up ridiculously amounts of screen space is totally insane. Yes, you can change the size of tiles, but that requires tweaking, which is only available from a context menu activated by right-clicking. How do you right-click on a touch screen? With the default size of the tiles the screen fills up quickly and constantly having to scroll in whatever direction is getting old really fast. Especially for novice users, because what they don't see is not there, the main reason not to have invisible hot spots - which use up space on the screen that cannot be used for anything else, so it might as well be a button and thus be more obvious and intuitive.
Tony A
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Tony A,
User Rank: Strategist
3/15/2012 | 3:12:35 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Oh, sorry Paul, it's not you, there are lots of contributors to this insipid new standard for leadoff articles in IT ezines. I get the same thing from LinkedIn, "5 Qualities of Great Employees", "7 Secrets of Successful CIO's", etc.

Since I was no fan of the interface in Vista, or Windows 7, or Office 2007, it is not like shocking news that the Windows 8 interface bites it. Counting on the ingenuity of users to figure things out is a good way of avoiding the effort of making them work intuitively.
Tony A
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Tony A,
User Rank: Strategist
3/15/2012 | 3:03:45 PM
re: Windows 8 Broken, Ex-Microsoft Worker Says
Wait, isn't there something wrong with the title of this column? Shouldn't it be "8 Problems with Windows Mobile Platform", or "4.7 Reasons to Stick with Android" or "17 Ways to Hold the Attention of Readers with ADD" - that is, the usual standard for Paul's byline? Why does he suddenly expect us to wrap our minds around a story where the paragraphs are not enumerated? Did everybody here suddenly get a high school diploma or something?
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