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IT Job Seekers: Resume Liars
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TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 12:37:51 PM
Whew!
Sure glad my company never checked on whether I invented the Internet or not....
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 12:41:41 PM
Catch 22
"There's this perception that their resumes will be vetted by a computer, so if they don't list the keywords and skills that the company is looking for, they may not get a call." Yes, we have heard this repeatedly from job seekers. Yet lying is not a good option, either. Vetting resumes by computer certainly has its downsides, doesn't it? My resume has the right keywords but doesn't tell you who I am. My recommendations do...
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 12:42:27 PM
Re: Whew!
Wait, are you Al Gore in disguise, Terry?
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 12:53:58 PM
Re: Whew!
You found me out. I sure wasn't putting "failed Presidential candidate" on my resume, nobody hires a loser.  :-)
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 4:25:38 PM
Re: Catch 22
Are most resume lies caught by careful research or automated flagging? If the latter, I'd expect some false positives. I wonder if that's an issue.
phillyrivera
IW Pick
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phillyrivera,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/12/2014 | 5:59:44 PM
Re: Catch 22
Good points from both of you. Automated vetting of candidates is not a fine science and companies who use this should be asking themselves: Are we letting in the right people, or excluding good people? Without some human intervention, analysis or ongoing optimization of the process, you could be thinking you are getting good results, but either missing good people or getting unqualified candidates, causing extra work for your recruiters.
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 10:41:49 PM
Re: Catch 22 & Who do your really know?
Good point about the false positives but I also think that people are applying for jobs that they are not qualified at all or very unqualified.  So as a result they lie about meeting the criteria when in fact they don't.  The internet makes it very easy to find jobs, very easy to apply but the net result is that it makes potential employers struggle to the point the jobs never get filled.   Due to the overwhelming amount of resumes and just too many candidates to properly filter and qualify.  I think we will go back, if we are not already there, that it does not really matter what you know, but it really does, but rather who you know.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 1:34:25 AM
Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
Thanks Kristin for addressing resume Liars. This has been going on since the very first resume and I don't see an end to it ever. With the competition for employment being what it is - lying or embellishment of skills was destine to become more commonplace.

Unfortunately, this speaks to a flaw in human nature which I have given up trying to figure out much less trying to rectify.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 9:53:53 AM
Re: Resume Liars
I'm not sure how I feel about this topic. The results of the survey are interesting, but they immediately raise a few questions, and leave me a little skeptical. Employment history is simple enough, but how do these managers supposedly know someone is lying about their skills? That seems more or less impossible to do without seeing the person in action, doesn't it? Aren't previous employers restricted by law to only discuss start and end dates and a few select other topic (or am I mistaken about that?) - so that puts 'responsibilities' in a grey area as well.

If they're saying they suspected someone was lying, that opens up way too much room for bias and subjectivity for my taste. For example, only 7% of the people surveyed said they would look past a lie if they liked a candidate... but that might be because they chose to believe a candidate they liked wasn't lying (when he was) and falsely believed a candidate they didn't like was lying. Like Thomas, I feel like the very presence of computers in this process throws a wrench into these numbers, too. Too much room for false positives (or false negatives) or simply skewing the hiring manager's expectations. It was worth the read just to discover the higher incidence of these problems in IT jobs, though.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
8/13/2014 | 10:36:31 AM
Re: Flawed Human Nature and The Resume
Technorati & Kristin 

For some reason, this article immediately reminded me to this article on tricks to apear smart during meetings. It seems like the perfect complement to one of those resumes. 

Technorati, you say: "With the competition for employment being what it is - lying or embellishment of skills was destine to become more commonplace."

So, I wonder, who do you think is the one to blame here, the employees, or the employers, or unemployment? I am not saying resemes don't have to be honest. I am wondering if some people don't feel push to the edge and see the embellisment of their skills as the only way out to get a job. What do you think? 

"Unfortunately, this speaks to a flaw in human nature which I have given up trying to figure out much less trying to rectify."

I know what you mean. Yet, every time the topic of "human nature" is brought in onto the table I can't help but questioning about what human nature really is, or if this is just yet another invention of society to justify the unjustifiable, which is what I think "human nature" is. :/ You see? 

-Susan 

 

 
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