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Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
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FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
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6/16/2012 | 2:30:07 AM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
Here's a question: If you -- anyone out there -- could start a mobile business to compete with Apple and Google, knowing that if you picked one of the following three choices, the other two would go away, which would you choose (this question is about assets, not company baggage, but the product history baggage does come with it): WinPhone 7, RIM OSes (let's say BB OS and the upcoming version 10/QNX), or Palm WebOS? (Feel free to say "None of the above, Symbian would be my choice.")
mrao30001
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mrao30001,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/15/2012 | 8:59:55 PM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
Precisely. I don't know why it would have lost its soul to have made Android devices any more than making Windows devices. Google was spot on. Two turkeys don't make an eagle. Elop chose very poorly in deciding to go with Windows in the first place. And even if he wanted to hedge his bets, he should have first gone with Android and then created Windows phone on a secondary track. Nokia makes great hardware and at one time, even Symbian was great. But they sat on the laurels and didn't make a touch based phone (and I mean a resistive touch based one). I remember talking to a Symbian rep at Java One in 2005 and pointing out flaws in Symbian's contacts app and searches and he just brushed me off. Which reminded me of the Palm representative I spoke to in 2000 about updating their development tools, but they were very happy with Code Warrior. Oh well...
Don..112
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Don..112,
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6/15/2012 | 7:48:46 PM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
In this article and attached comments, melgross is one of the few to remember that the Nokia - Microsoft deal was more than just Nokia supporting Windows Phone. I've seen a number of articles castigating Nokia, but somehow Microsoft escapes the ugly commentary as a partner in this mess. What gives???
EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/15/2012 | 12:33:10 PM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
Have to agree. If Nokia was going to go Windows Phone, they should have adopted it and let customers decide which of their offerings they liked best (Symbian, Meego, or Windows Phone), and then decided which one to eliminate. Instead they went ALL IN on Windows Phone and alienated many Nokia faithful (myself included). I waited around until late April of this year to see what Nokia would do with Windows Phone. I then chose Android (Galaxy Nexus GSM) as I felt it was the most Open and least constrained mobile OS. Bought it unlocked from the Google Play store (somethig I had done with my previous Nokia phones).
Many have said Symbian couldn't do this or that. Current offering from Nokia (Symbian Belle) doesn't seem to be limited in any way that I can think of and MANY have raved about Nokia N9 running Meego that Nokia is going to allow to die. What Elop failed to realize is that many Nokia fans were fans of being different and the freedom that Nokia had to invent. Now Nokia is shackled to Windows Phone and Microsoft's whims. Why has Nokia not come out with a Windows Phone with a Physical Qwerty Keyboard to attract Nokia and Blackberry fans who want something new, but also want a Physical Qwerty.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
6/15/2012 | 11:56:18 AM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
Symbian wasn't crashing. That's the whole problem here. The last quarter before Elop came in and said that they screwed up Symbian and that it was dying, Nokia had sold 28 million Symbian phones. That was an increase of 36% YOY. It was half the growth of the smartphone market, but still a very good increase. The quarter after he said they were discontinuing it, and told developers to stop developing for it and to develop for Win Phone instead, sales dropped like a stone, and have been dropping rapidly ever since.

Nokia's entire strategy is failing. They never should have done what they did. Now it's coming back to haunt them.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
6/15/2012 | 11:49:59 AM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
And by giving themselves to Microsoft, they haven't given up their soul? If anything, they given themselves body and soul to Microsoft. With Android, even though I don't like it, Nokia would be able to go their own way as Samsung, and others, have done. With Win Phone they can't, despite what they and Microsoft are saying.
jonfingas
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jonfingas,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/15/2012 | 12:46:56 AM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
There's a difference between bashing and simply reporting negative news.

The Lumia 900 is a fine device, but it's *not* better than Android or the iPhone in ways that will lure many converts. Hardware points like screen resolution and performance still matter (Windows Phone runs quickly, but it won't magically enable 1080p video on a single-core chip). The camera just isn't as good as on an iPhone 4S or some Android phones, like the One X and Galaxy S III it's up against at AT&T. Browsing is unambiguously worse on Windows Phone. And while Microsoft will swear up and down that WP7's social networking is better than everyone else's, it's not -- most people go to Facebook or Twitter to check everyone's updates, not a contact to see one person's.

When you add those up, you see the problem. Nokia can't stage a comeback on "reasonably good" -- people have that already, and significant flaws spook customers away even if there's a solid core. To trump Android and iOS, Nokia needs something that is at least as good in almost every respect, and preferably better. We'll see what Windows Phone 8 brings, but you can't play catch-up on hardware (and some parts of software) while expecting to leapfrog your competitors.
ANON1237925156805
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ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/14/2012 | 9:28:01 PM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
Nice article. Spot on. Just one thin that doesn't ring true.

The prior post is surely right about Symbian. With no apps and no mindshare, the amount of revenue it generated could only have shrunk, and pretty quickly. Nokia was right to take Symbian off life support and focus its efforts elsewhere; in fact they should have done it sooner.

The question then becomes where else to focus. Windows mobile was a savvy long term bet, but with no mindshare itself, it isn't suited to be cast in the role of someone else's immediate savior. That suggests that initially Android should have been in the mix.

Android phones designed with Nokia's flair, beauty, originality and quality might have become enough of a cash cow to fund them through a painful transition, especially given their strong sales infrastructure in Asia and elsewhere. Nokia needn't have lost its soul-as you put it- to do this. The Windows effort could still be going on, or some other effort to forge their own distinctive path.

Folks would be more likely to walk down whatever path they chose if Nokia's name had retained the luster that say Samsung's has at the moment. (When Samsung rumbled about growing its own OS or acquiring Palm's WebOS, people listened.)

If successful this would have set the table for Nokia to introduce its top drawer Windows phones and perhaps eventually to eliminate Android devices altogether and become the unique player they desire to be. Gotta crawl before you try to sprint. Good luck Nokia. . .
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/14/2012 | 9:05:43 PM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
What would help Nokia is for you guys in the press to stop trumpeting Android and Apple all of the time while bashing Nokia/MS. The Lumia 900 is a stellar first offering and deserves better and more frequent press.

Otherwise, the lemmings remain fearful of buying anything other than what's perceived as cool for the moment. It takes a seismic shift to get them moving in any direction other than the cliff edge.
jbaumgartner107
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jbaumgartner107,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/14/2012 | 4:13:52 PM
re: Nokia At Risk Of Joining RIM And Palm
Symbian was crashing well before the burning platform memo. In all likelihood, the reason for the memo was because the crash had become increasingly transparent to the BoD at Nokia. Recall, OPK was fired because he had continually attempted to buy market-share by dropping prices on Nokia's Symbian products. Clearly, the continued cost cutting is completely in line with the previous announcements...Elop is getting rid of the university research staff and putting in place people who know how to run a business. As for Meltemi...it seems S40 will serve the purpose well, to include Harmattan like full touch swipe gestures and a very competitive cost base.
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