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4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
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moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
7/3/2012 | 7:11:35 PM
re: 4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
Or just get your employees a decent system and not one of these off the shelf Dell boxes that crap out after a few months are run as fast as a tortoise in hibernation.
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2012 | 6:19:01 PM
re: 4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
Yes, there is an advertisement for Citrix, VMware, Microsoft and the other proprietary virtualization tools in this article. There is no reason people need to use them though. VERDE works just fine. Red Hat KVM works. That is a substantial cost reduction.

Microsoft obviously doesn't want to lose money when people move to thin-client, so they license their software to make thin-client more expensive than it should be. There is no reason most people need to use Microsoft Windows anymore. It will require ditching Office as well, but it is definitely possible to use Red Hat or Ubuntu or whatever you like as the host OS image. IBM SmartClient and Oracle/Sun VDI both have integrated VDI stacks which provide everything you need in one bundle. IBM's has no cost, unless you want to add Lotus... not sure about Oracle, but they are both a fraction of the cost of the Microsoft-Citrix/VMware model.
EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2012 | 12:45:50 PM
re: 4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
As usual, this article makes no mention of cost. We have a pretty good method of managing in house computers to the point that we cannot drive costs down by using Citrix, VDI, etc... (by the time you figure out cost for Terminal Services CALs, Server Infrastrucutre (memory and diskspace, etc...) require to support the BYOD. We have found that allowing BYOD devices to RDP and remote control company desktop computers does allow for some reduction in cost by not requiring as many company owned laptops (i.e. allowing home desktop, laptops, tablets to take the place of workers needing to take home company laptops).
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2012 | 4:38:09 AM
re: 4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
I couldn't agree with this article more. Bring on the BYOE (everything). IT should write applications for the browser with as much as possible written on the server side. It makes it easier for IT to manage and upgrade as well as for end users because they don't have to install the latest version of some plug-in and bring their PCs in for upgrades. When everything is written for an OS agnostic browser, client device management just became much easier.

Now there are some who will wring their hands about security concerns. I would ask them this question: What is a more secure management strategy, having all data contained on locked down servers behind a firewall with secure VPN access, or having hundreds/thousands of PCs wandering around at Starbucks with confidential data stored on the hard drive? PC-server is the security problem, not the solution.

IT should not be in the business of picking business tools for end users. There is no need anymore for IT not to be enabled to work with a variety of client OSs and devices. As you mention, this is not new, untested technology. It has been around for over a decade.

If a company wants to retain ownership and control of the devices, I would also mention that this a great opportunity to introduce a lower cost client OS, Ubuntu, RHEL, or whatever. In the next few years, the only thing a client OS will be required to do for the vast majority of users is open a web browser.
Sam Iam
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Sam Iam,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2012 | 4:16:54 AM
re: 4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
"When talking BYOD or BYOC, the primary point is to ensure that corporate data is safe."

If there is any data on the device or computer, you are doing it wrong. All of the data should reside on the server with zero confidential data stored on the device or computer.

From mainframe to client-server to cloud is a 360 back to centralized computing. Instead of all workloads running on a mainframe, they runs on a bunch of clustered servers (or possibly a mainframe again) but the principle is the same. Prior to the client-server fiasco, security, data governance, access controls were simple to manage. With client-server, someone thought it would be easier and more secure to have 5,000 computers to manage instead of five and security, data governance, access control, data management, etc took a giant step backwards. The centralized model needed to be modified and instead it was wholesale abandoned. The move back towards centralized will improve manageability, security, access controls, etc... it has been a slow path back toward the mainframe/centralized computing since the internet was invented.

"And finally, who bares the brunt of supporting a user's device when there's some crazy issue that pops up because the user's child's favorite application requires one version of something like Java while the user's role as an employee requires using an application that requires a second (and competing) version?"

You are thinking about this from a client-server mindset. If you do it right, there should be no Java processing on the client side. It should all be done on the server side with end users holding screens that show them what is going on in the server, be it a corporate server or a server on the internet.... Regardless, people seem to be figuring it out now with their own PCs, so I would not be too worried about it. If someone's computer does get really out of whack, just wipe the OS image and start over. As there is nothing on the client side other than a web browser, it isn't a big deal.
Andrew Hornback
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Andrew Hornback,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/3/2012 | 2:06:41 AM
re: 4 Steps To A Successful BYOC Program
With the move to push applications and services into "the cloud", there's a lot of relevance here, but at the same time, some questionable relevance.

When talking BYOD or BYOC, the primary point is to ensure that corporate data is safe. When a user brings their own device into the corporate environment - who ultimately becomes responsible for any data stored on that device? The individual who actually owns the hardware or the company that owns (and is responsible for) the data on the device?

Sure, the consumerization of technology (devices, doo-dads, computers) has led to more users being able to supply their own needs - but is this really the best approach for an IT organization to adopt?

And finally, who bares the brunt of supporting a user's device when there's some crazy issue that pops up because the user's child's favorite application requires one version of something like Java while the user's role as an employee requires using an application that requires a second (and competing) version? I've seen this issue in the field, it's not pretty - especially when the user in question happens to be the CEO of the organization.

Andrew Hornback
InformationWeek Contributor


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