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5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
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Greenstone
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Greenstone,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 7:05:28 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
During Windows 8 installation, Microsoft should allow users to select if they want Windows Classic (or an updated version) installed or Metro on their devices. My wish list is simple: (1) make things easier to find, not more confusing; (2) see number 1. I know users won't initially know if they want the Metro interface, so make it so users can remove it.
Johnnythegeek
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Johnnythegeek,
User Rank: Strategist
12/1/2012 | 7:04:31 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
First off not many need Windows 8 on a PC. If you have Windows 7 and you don't have a touch screen. Then Windows 8 is pointless in many ways. As for the tablet, Apple has had three or more years to develop a app store and eco system of third party accessories for the iPad. It also has a more fluid connection between OS X and IOS. Neither OS tries to be what its not. Microsoft in a rush to play catch up tried to mold a tablet OS into a desktop/laptop OS and in my opinion failed to sell it to the public. Best thing Microsoft can do is what it did with Vista. Fix it.
Jnome
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Jnome,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 6:41:23 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Make metro an option but not default. Frankly there's just to much flipping, a person cannot concentrate with all those flashy boxes rotating content. Here's what I want. The desktop is the default with the search icon replacing the old start button and have the search button do what it does now. It would work the same on mobile. Per-haps give the option to add tiles to the desktop like widgets.. Oh shoot I just realized what I described is Android.. I dont know windows I hope you can figure this out!
ajax2cle
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ajax2cle,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 6:38:35 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
<ctrl>+<esc>. Oh wait, now i have to bring my mouse all the way over to the right. Click Spy Glass. Go to internet explorer and search "Shutdown PC windows 8"

Really?? Really! .......Why??

Microsoft, you have created products and established rules for using those products over the years. Rules that, as users, we have all learned for better or worse to get our work done. By changing those rules(I am talking about the interface changes) you are creating an obstacle to getting our work done.

Most of us these days have to do much more with considerably less resources, and by you imposing yourself on us like this, makes us much more ready to search for alternatives.

Go ahead and enhance the old rules. But don't disregard the old and establish a brand new set. You have had great amount of success because we did our work and did not even know you were there.

</esc></ctrl>
krumdriller
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krumdriller,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 6:27:42 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
I bought a new laptop even though I would have to have waited until after Christmas. The reason, get one while I could still get Windows 7. MS did not need a re invention they just needed to keep improving Windows 7. I have Vista on my old laptop and already like W 7 better but I was not going to buy one if I had to take W 8. In fact I was looking at Macs instead.
crushkittykitty
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crushkittykitty,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 6:15:22 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
meanwhile I'm sitting back on my Ubuntu watching as Microsoft tries to sell yet another operating system that will be plagued by viruses spyware, been using Ubuntu for years with no anti virus and have yet to get one all im saying is give it a try works for me
here is a good place to start https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
or if you would like to read more http://ubuntutheotheros.webs.c...
you do have a choice
Greg7777
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Greg7777,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 5:21:01 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Ok, first of all, the author is not an i-tard. I personally hate apple products, but I gotta say the points that are being made are all valid, and you sound like the real tard with your defense. For example, the two different IEs? Come on. Choice is good, that's why I love Android, but Android has choice with a purpose. Choice that allows you to seek out different experiences. This is not about user choice. This is about Microsoft cramming two different OS's into one and creating a giant blob of a mess. And this problem is not just about IE, it's about the general issue of Metro apps not working in dekstop and vice versa. The average consumer wants things to just work, and doesn't want to get confused with a new product.

As for the price, how do you argue that it's low? As the author says, it's the same as the iPad, and how do you get consumers to buy a whole new platform with little familiarity to things they've used before when they could buy something familiar for the same price?

Whatever the reason for the RT release, I personally feel that having Windows 8 & RT is another blow to Microsofts attempts to get traction. Yes, it was necessary, because Windows 8 needs the x86 architecture to run legacy apps, but the RT (ARM) design is better for mobile, but the result is a fragmented mess that makes Android look positively unified by comparison. Again, the average consumer is not going to want this kind of headache.

Of course MS is courting (buying) app developers as quickly as they can, but the fact is people buy their mobile devices for the apps, and while I'm sure MS is working overtime to get a facebook app to this platform, the lack of one right now is a major blow to sales.

Now, every time the author criticizes the UI, you claim he "doesn't get it". Well, I'm sorry, but it's you who doesn't get it. Microsoft's new UI is a clunky nightmare. You've got Metro and Desktop, things that work in one don't work in the other, you're constantly jumping back and forth... I'm sorry, I've used on in a store, and while there are great shortcuts to help make this work better than I thought, I can't see myself putting up with that crap, and I'm a power user. Clearly, since the product isn't selling, more people agree with me and the author than with you.

This is the only place I may agree with you, Microsoft can't go back. But at the end of the day lots of people love the classic look, and even with that app you're talking about the user still has to deal with Metro.

Now, you clearly spend a lot of time criticizing the author, but I suggest you stop drinking MS koolaid (god, didn't even know anyone drank that) and shut the f@ck up. Take your rude and ignorant comment and shove it where the sun don't shine, which is where you should put your Windows 8 device as well.
bubbab0y
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bubbab0y,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 5:16:43 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
I'm an old guy and not as tech savvy as most of your posters. But I can't be the only one in this situation: I need a new desktop PC (currently using Vista, don't laugh). I would buy one tomorrow with Win 8 and I would probably be somewhat frustrated by all the problems you are noting. However I can't even get that far. The cost of a new desktop for Win 8 is WAY TOO HIGH because of the touch screen. BestBuy is not even advertising any desktops with touchscreens, probably because they know it would be a waste of time and only scare customers away. They want them to be in the store already when they find out. I don't want a laptop because I want a 22+" screen at home, I already have a work laptop and I want to be able to easily/cheaply upgrade components on my personal desktop over the next few years.

Bottom line: Win 8 does not seem to be aimed at all at the desktop market. Am I missing something?
BobbyDeeJr
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BobbyDeeJr,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 5:06:22 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
As a person shopping for a new Windows desktop machine who's primarily going to use it for things such as: Video Editing, Architectural Drafting, 3d Rendering, Audio Recording, and Graphic Design, the LAST thing I want is an OS that is constantly trying to connect to the internet and trying to sell me "apps". I have never bought an "app" in my life and do not plan to.

I have read a lot of complaints about Windows8 but few coming from my perspective. I DO NOT use facebook, twitter, or any other social media site. Someone mentioned an OS to track your every move and that what it feels like.

Whenever possible, I revert any windows computer to the 'classic' look because that is what I want: a bare-bones machine that can run my programs and nothing else and eats up as little of the cpu as possible.

Even as a graphics person, I have zero interest in their 'hip' new interface. As many have suggested, they should have made that an option for people who want to have direct links to things, or, made it for portable devices only.

Maybe some people will find some joy in it, and that is fine, but for me who needs a computer to do high-end media, I am going to purchase a machine with Windows7, which is completely fine and totally usable (even if more dumbed-down and annoying than XP)...

Basically the ONLY way to save Windows 8 is to have a release that allows you to completely disable the so called "Metro" and lets you run your computer without trying to force a lifestyle choice and failed branding mission down your throat...
pbaker232
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pbaker232,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2012 | 4:50:44 PM
re: 5 Ways Microsoft Can Save Windows 8
Have been in the IT business since the early nineties and have been a loyal MS customer all that time. We ran Windows 8 for six months on a trial basis and decided it was a no-go. The OS is meant essentially for phones and touch screens. We haven't the inclination to make our employees suffer through the frustration. If we have to make that kind of decision and cause frustration, we'd rather it gave us something in the bargain. Unfortunately, we have already decided and told MS (although we are giving MS six months for a decision) we will be moving over to the MAC OS...and we are not alone.
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