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H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
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m4gplus
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m4gplus,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/12/2013 | 3:31:35 AM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
Hello,

Im among the "less talented". I think some of this information is prejudiced and partisan. The argument - appear to be somewhat less talented on average, as indicated by their lower wages, than the Americans

doesnt hold, I get paid less because I demand less. I demand less because I need less, my country pays me far lesser than the US, so to me, its great!

As far as less talented, im less trained, we dont have the resources. Im also a Mensa member, from a country where the smartest people in the world are born. If we arent rich, stupidity does not follow.

Im tired of what im increasingly seeing as racial digs - "code monkey" "you get what you pay for" and so forth. Am I wrong?

I dont have a solution for your fear for your job, this situation is complex. I do know that blaming people you do not know or care about is not a solution, just a bigger problem.
Mark
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Mark,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/5/2013 | 10:11:22 AM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
Top quartile EE/CS graduate here, from a top 20 university. Have submitted my resume thousands of times to firms like Facebook, Google, etc., without even so much as the courtesy of a response or interview. Hard to believe that these firms are looking for talent if they're not even bothering to call me or my professional peers up for interviews. That H-1B is even allowed is a travesty.
EgorA503
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EgorA503,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/24/2013 | 8:35:35 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
"In the CS case the former foreign students appear
to be somewhat less talented on average, as indicated by their lower
wages, than the Americans." No, what this fact is saying that H-1B workers are paid less by companies. It doesn't say anything about their intelligence.
virgoptrex
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virgoptrex,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2013 | 9:25:43 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
your problem is you are a whiner and refuse to accept the reality of the global business blaming h1bs rather than greed of corporations.
virgoptrex
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virgoptrex,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2013 | 9:20:51 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
you are a wackadoo liar!!!
SpaceVegetable
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SpaceVegetable,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2013 | 5:48:23 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
Yes, but the companies are competing globally against others with lower costs, so they may not have the option of paying more. If an employee doesn't bring in more revenue than what it costs to employ him/her, then there's no point in hiring anyone. Stuff that increases employment costs, like unions or Obysmal-Care, isn't helping, either.
SpaceVegetable
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SpaceVegetable,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2013 | 5:45:23 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
Don't forget, engineering and science are simply not considered "cool" in popular culture. Look at TV and movies. Most of those portrayed as being into those fields are stereotyped as geeks or "eccentric" weirdos. We have a culture of people wanting easy money, like on reality shows, yet fewer and fewer who take up the challenge of more difficult courses of study like engineering. Add in the pathetic state of primary education - especially in math and science - and you end up with a shortage of talent.
SpaceVegetable
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SpaceVegetable,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2013 | 5:40:15 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
There is a shortage of experienced software engineers, judging by the recruiter activity and the pay rates I'm seeing. I haven't seen demand like this since 1999. As for H1B's, they are not that skilled, IMHO. One place I worked purposely kept their code dumbed down and simplistic so they could hire cheap H1B's to maintain it. Don't forget that a lot of people left the software field after the dot-com bust and now there's a gap of people with that level of experience. Works great for me since I can fill that gap, but there's not enough of us to go around. That said, I oppose increasing H1B caps any more. I'd rather see newbies and others trained. Unfortunately, nowadays we are all commodities and need to see to training and maintaining skills on our own. That's the down side of global markets.
voster
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voster,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/14/2013 | 4:28:45 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
You talk of offshoring and outsourcing, but the 65,000 H1-B entrants are but a drop in the ocean of the labor force in the outsourced countries. It may not always hold true, but of the IT workers in the H1-B pool, they are probably significantly above the mean skill level of your average outsourced worker.

So it's quite an invalid comparison.
voster
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voster,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/14/2013 | 4:25:22 PM
re: H-1B Workers Not Best Or Brightest, Study Says
Hi Not.Disgruntled,

Your anecdote piqued my interest, so I'll just pipe in for a bit.

I hope when you mention, "ic *tester* experience", you don't mean production IC tester systems like Teradyne's Catalyst etc.

If you do, then I'm afraid all the experience you mention above that you put into your CV is simply irrelevant, as IC tester experience in this case is a highly specialized skill, which if you would like to pick up, would require you to go for an entry-level job. This is true for anyone, foreign or local.

If you were gunning for a mid-level IC tester job without any experience with those massive testing machines, then I am not surprised that on-the-job training was not offered.
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