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Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
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Rocwurst
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Rocwurst,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 2:23:30 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Actually, Neilsen reports that in the USA, 40% of iOS users have incomes above $100K versus only 25% of Android users, while double the percentage of Android users have incomes below $25K. Looks like your "grandmothers and 12 year olds" are pretty wealthy. *rolls eyes*

In fact, Android is losing the teenage demographic:
- 48% of teens now report that they are using iPhones in Q 1 2013, up from 40% just six months previously.
- 62% of teens expect their next phone will be an iPhone
- only 23% of teens expect their next phone to be an Android device (Piper Jaffrey)

In business, Apple is accelerating away from Android:
- Apple's iOS mobile business market share increased from 69% to 78% in Q1 2013 while Android declined from 30% last year to only 22% (Egnyte)
- iPad captured 93.2% of Business tablet market in Q4 2012 (Good Technology)
- iPhone accounted for 73% of all non-BB business smartphones (Good Technology)
- iOS devices in total represented 77% of mobile device activations in the enterprise market in Q4 2012 (Good Technology)

In terms of app platform, Apple continues to destroy Android:
- iOS developers make 430% more revenue than Android developers (Distimo)
- 84% of mobile games revenue is generated by iOS (NewZoo)
- iOS games revenue is almost 3x greater than Android in Q1 2013 (IDC and AppAnnie)

Developers, content providers and publishers are not making up the difference in advertising:
- Flurry reports that in-app ad income is only 23% the amount of paid-for app revenue.
- 63% of ad impression within apps came from iOS in 2012 while Android plummeted from 53% in 2011 to 37% in 2012 according to Velti.
- 98.1% of tablet ad traffic comes from iPads (OnSwipe)
- 94.6% of Tablet web browser share is iPad (Chitika)
- 69% of mobile ad viewing share is iOS vs 29% for Android (Chitika)
- 51% of in-app and web ad revenue is generated by iOS (Opera)
- MoPub reports that 75% of ad revenue is generated by iOS users.

Apple's iOS dominates Android in all the metrics that matter.
DavidB
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DavidB,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2013 | 3:59:08 AM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Spot on. Apples demographic now is grandmothers and 12 year olds. With Google's momentum and solid infrastructure; apple is not catching up.
jfutral303
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jfutral303,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2013 | 9:01:56 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Aright. I'll play your game:

"Part of the problem is that Apple and Microsoft (not to mention Facebook) spend far too much energy keeping Google out instead of deploying services that are better than Google's."

Many would say Apple's problem started when they let Google _in_. Apple's problem with Maps started when Google refused to offer services Apple requested of Google. Seems it was Google keeping Apple out, not the other way around, that put Apple in the position of developing Apple Maps without Google.

But that was then this is now. So now it is typical each company leap frogging. Nothing "catch uppy" about that, just business as usual.

And as someone has already pointed out, one issue with iCloud vs, what exactly is Google's alternative? Nothing? Ok, who is needs to play catch up in that instance?

Joe
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
5/20/2013 | 7:29:25 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Apple's problems with iCloud and Maps are not mere fantasy. And Siri certainly could be more than it is.
Steve__S
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Steve__S,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2013 | 6:59:01 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
"But it hasn't shown that it has the product pipeline to maintain its present dominance."


Apple has never shown their product pipeline in the past. Yet, it has managed to demonstrate a history of innovation and strong product releases. Despite this established history, you feel it's better to just assume Apple has nothing of interest in the pipeline. Based on what? Can you at least wait until after WWDC in a few weeks before jumping to such conclusions? Did you ever wonder why Apple's developer events are exciting, but Google's event was not so much? Did you ever consider that's because Google has already played their hand and likewise has nothing to show at their event? Honestly, how long have you been following this industry?
Steve__S
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Steve__S,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2013 | 6:50:22 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Rocworst, nice post...

<sarcasm> Don't let the actual usage statistics cloud your view. Clearly, device activations and that rate at which Google can copy Apple are the metrics that count the most. </sarcasm>
Steve__S
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Steve__S,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2013 | 6:46:53 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
There are a number of points in this article that just don't hold water...



Device activations - Yes, I'm sure if Apple were to give away their code and have no control over their ecosystem, they'd win that race as well. Of course, Apple is actually interested in... you know, making a profit. Google doesn't benefit from Android activations directly and even Google claims to make more money per iOS device.



Google Search / rhetoric - Great, so Google gets credit for rhetoric because they're "thinking" about taking risks. Apple, meanwhile, gets no credit for disrupting their most successful iPod mini with an iPod nano product. Or disrupting their entire iPod line with the iPhone product... or disrupting their desktop / laptop hardware business with the launch of their successful tablet business. Sorry, but I fail to see the point you're trying to make here Thomas.



As for Apple maps... I find that the majority of criticism for Apple's maps comes from those who don't even use the product. I'm guessing that applies to the author here as well. Maps aren't easy to make. Apple is criticized for coming out with a product as complicated as global maps that isn't perfect upon introduction. Maps have improved greatly since it was introduced and is an overall great product. I have Google maps installed on my phone as an option, but honestly prefer Apple's maps.



As for iCloud, yes, developers are having problems with the "core data" functionality. That much is true. But, if Apple is so far behind here, where is Google's answer to Core Data? It doesn't exist. Okay, so let's bash Apple for a piece that isn't working right that Apple's competitors haven't even been bold enough to try.



Chromebook Pixel? - Wow, that shows that yet another company can copy Apple's designs. This is supposed to "set off alarm bells" at Apple? Really? How's the Chromebook Pixel selling? ...(crickets)... Copying Apple's products and designs is nothing new for Google and nothing for Apple to get excited about. They're used to it.



Google Play game services - An attempt to copy Apple's established Game Center function, albeit on more platforms. Yes, I see a theme here, Apple creates, Google copies.



Finally, the author complains about Google moving faster and compete more vigorously. Based on what? Because Google telegraphs everything they do? Do you realize that Apple's WWDC is less than a month away? What do you know about iOS 7? Nothing? What do you know about Apple's product plans? Nothing? Yet, you feel comfortable enough to make comparisons and comments that are essentially unsupported. I guess that's what passes for "journalism" these days.
jfutral303
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jfutral303,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2013 | 6:46:28 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
The only problem with that approach is up to that weird run up to $700 (which was deserved but for different reasons than most investors seem to have chosen) that has been typical Apple sentiment for almost two decades. That's what Wall Street thought when Apple came out with the iMac and revenues and profit continued to rise. That's what they thought with the iPod, also as revenue and profit continued to rise. That's what they thought when the iPhone first hit the market, even as profit and revenues continued to rise. But it was pretty much a given that after each earnings report share price would drop because people didn't think they could keep the future looking as bright, even as Apple continued to prove them wrong. Luckily the more level headed longs on Apple helped keep it going up on average.

Then the rest of Wall Street got giddy and the share price shot up. Of course, based on fundamentals, it finally caught up with Apple's financials. But now the ne'er-do-wells have had their say, even in the face of continued growth.

This is not to say Google can't do well and by and large has, even in the face of Apple's revenue and revenue growth vs Google's, but there is nothing to indicate that Apple needs to "catch" Google except in someone's fantasy world. Personally I think the whole notion of "Apple needs to catch Google" or "Google needs to catch Apple" is a non-sequitor to their respective accomplishments.

Joe
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
5/20/2013 | 6:01:26 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Apple in the present produces more revenue than Google, but investors have an eye on the future. And at least in Wall Street's eyes, Google's future looks brighter the moment than Apple's.

http://www.wolframalpha.com/in...

Apple is very strong in some areas, without a doubt. But it hasn't shown that it has the product pipeline to maintain its present dominance. Nor has it shown that it can thrive in cloud services, where Google is strong. Perhaps it will.
Rocwurst
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Rocwurst,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2013 | 4:32:46 PM
re: Google To Apple: Catch Us If You Can
Okay, I'll try posting my response in parts and see if Information Week stops deleting my post:

Actually, it is more Apple saying to Google "catch us if you can" in all the metrics that actually matter. You see with 600 million iOS devices around the world now, Apple's iOS continues to obliterate Android in actual usage share, developer revenue, profit share, web browser usage, e-commerce revenue, advertising impressions, advertising revenue, etc etc.

Most Android devices sold are cheap featurephone replacements that get thrown away at the end of contract. Samsung themselves have admitted they have only been selling 10 million Galaxy S3 smartphones every 2 months since launch versus the 37-47 million iPhones Apple sells every three months. The rest of Samsung's smartphone sales are cheap models that are very poor for browsing or apps.

Chrome only managed less than 3% share of the mobile market in April 2013 compared to Mobile Safari at 62% marketshare, towering over the Android browser at 22%.

Then there is the fact that Apple continues to obliterate Android in usage share.
- 67% of mobile video was played by iOS - devices in 2012 (Ooyala)
- 83% of airport wifi connections are iOS devices (Boingo)
- 88% of mobile e-commerce revenue is from iPads (IBM)
- 90% of online retail revenue is generated by iOS devices (Rich Relevance)
- 76% of mobile web browsing is iOS (averaged over Net Applications, ComScore, AT Internet, Statcounter Global Stats (OS), W3Counter, WikiMedia)
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