Comments
Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
NPCO
50%
50%
NPCO,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 3:57:08 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
I just bought and installed StarDock's ModernMix, which lets you run Modern apps in a window. Simplistic full screen apps on a 30 inch monitor are horrible, but I thought maybe they'd be more palatable if they could run in smaller windows. I was wrong. I haven't found a single Modern app that's anything but a tragically simplistic, utterly useless version of some other real program. They're just terrible, and the fact that Microsoft truly thinks they should take over an entire monitor is astounding.

That said, I do like Windows 8 otherwise, but it's astonishing that the Start screen and the handful of Modern apps was all Microsoft could create in the 3 year development time of Windows 8. Really sad.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
50%
50%
CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 9:46:32 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
The next logical question is: "Why did they do that?"

Ads.

Ads, ads, and more friggin' Fisher-Price Metro Live Tile ads shoved down our collective throats.
moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/24/2013 | 11:48:14 AM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
Modern apps are geared towards a touch interface. Compact controls such as menus, radio buttons, check boxes, drop-downs and so on cannot be used for touch. So it needs large buttons that operate on only one type of click (ever tried to right click with your finger on a touch screen?). That means all the functionality needs to be stuffed into a very flat UI that uses up a lot of space and make usage way more complex. In order to regain some usability features need to be dropped so that there is only the bare bones functionality left. Also, many of these apps are built to work on small screens such as phones or tablets.
Touch is really a dozen steps back in UI evolution, almost as primitive as Apple's one button mouse, but even worse than that. And if you leave color out the Modern apps look like the faux windows environments on DOS. Just a box with some text in it. And we are supposed to not only like this, but also pay money for that?
barrie smith
50%
50%
barrie smith,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 4:37:56 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
I am someone who has followed and used Windows sine ME. I was happy with W7 but took advantage of the low priced upgrade and on installation I thought I would be OK with 8. But as time went on I became more and more frustrated with it as functions and shortcuts which I had been using all seem to be changed. The start menu being only one of many issues.

Yes, I know I can install Stardock, but really, why should I? It should be an integral part of the operating system. I use the start menu all the time in W7, why should MS make me change what they have taught me.
This has all happened as MS now want to follow Apple's lead in making it's customers pay for every little app going. Not the first time MS has followed somebody else's lead.

If I had come in as a new user I'm sure my reaction would be favourable than it currently is.

My other half won't even look at it as she feels she has been betrayed by MS.

I have now dual booted with a Linux distro which is now my main machine with only games/steam being the only reason now to boot to 8.

I will look at the promised improvements due later this year but for me to make 8 my main machine again there will have to be an awful lot of improving.

Signing off for now,
One dissolutioned MS customer.
Barrie
JPolk
50%
50%
JPolk,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 4:55:32 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
People just don't get it. They don't know what's good for them. They're dumb. And they just want to complain. <- That sums up most of what Windows 8 advocates and even Microsoft says about people who simply don't WANT to use this OS. Look, this is really very simple. If you make a car no one wants to drive you had better go back and make something else if you want to stay in the car business. You don't complain that no one wants to buy your car and you don't blame them for poor design. The market is going to buy what it wants. You can make that and profit or make what you want and shoot for a niche.
CarGod01
50%
50%
CarGod01,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 5:03:59 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
I've only been using computers since 1969, still a noob...

Yes, I have used interfaces from just about every supplier.

Learning new things is not much of a problem for me.

I actually beta tested every version of Windows until Vista.

I quit that one about 3/4 of the way through because MS refused to listen to the majority of testers who said it was junk.

This W8 Metro thing has me puzzled...why the hell would MS pull another stupid stunt so soon after Vista? Making Metro the default interface on all machines is so stupid...if it's not a tablet/touchscreen, Metro should be disabled by default!
I think we should fire those who made that decision. I will even supply a gallon of gasoline and a match...
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2013 | 5:05:59 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
You push a tablet user interface in the face of a bunch of desktop and lap top users who have no use for it and what do you expect, love? I think not. In trying to push their tablet and phone UI too hard, they have alienated the one group that actually liked Microsoft's operating systems. Really dumb. Give us back the START button and a real Desktop and an icon that lets us choose to get to the Metro, er I mean "Modern" UI if and when we want (for some that might be never).
DDURBIN1
50%
50%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2013 | 5:12:39 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
I bet Microsoft did their own study with the same results which makes it even more incredible Ballmer decided to do nothing and release Win8 anyway. I doubt the revenue generated from the Windows Store makes up for lost OS sales. If I were a stockholder I'd say Ballmer cost the company a lot of revenue and must go.
CopyingAppleIsDangerous
50%
50%
CopyingAppleIsDangerous,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 9:42:45 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
My personal estimate for what Ballmer expected from this stunt was (eventually) $25-$40 billion US per year. Sure, their App Store revenue sucks right now, but the senior executives had their sights set for converting the desktop. Even Forbes is calling the desktop "legacy desktop":

http://www.forbes.com/sites/to...

Yes, yes..it's stupid, but that's what you get when you let someone with a used-car-salesman mentality run a high-tech company.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2013 | 5:13:05 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
It was very frustrating for me. I HAD to buy a new PC in February and Dell insisted that it had to have Windows 8 on it...so I was stuck. Now I get advertisements from them touting the fact that Windows 7 is still available. That kind of paints a picture...
GoodGuy
50%
50%
GoodGuy,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 6:17:14 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
When I first used Windows 8 it was on a laptop without touch screen and i did not like it. I could not find anything. Then I used a friends laptop with touch screen and learned some the short cuts to the apps and I began to like it more and more. If you can use a smart phone you can use Windows 8. And from what I am reading 8.1 should resolve some concerns of many folks.
ANON1245867443530
50%
50%
ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/24/2013 | 4:12:46 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
Touchscreens on computers are stupid.
AsokAsus
50%
50%
AsokAsus,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 6:30:17 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
This is a powerful indication that the Windows 8/Windows RT/Metro
UI/Apps Store ecosystem has been a complete and total disaster for
Microsoft, almost totally alienating PC users while simultaneously
failing to move the needle one iota regarding Microsoft's "strategy" to
try to become relevant in mobile computing in any fashion whatsoever.
dpearce
50%
50%
dpearce,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2013 | 6:51:28 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
To me the modern 'metro' interface is inefficient at best, and downright frustrating at worst. Swiping in and out from the top, bottom and sides of the screen produces the desired result maybe 50% of the time...and so requires multiple attempts. Quite often you wind up pulling up (or sliding over) a different program, or closing the one you are on...I think the interface is clumsy, immature, and (at this point) a time waster. Of course you do have the option to switch to a strangely configured subset of Windows 7....
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2013 | 7:17:34 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
Extrapolating what AsokAsus said, what happens if this is a failure in the long run and very few tablet and/or phone users decide on buying Windows 8 driven devices, but instead, stick with the tried and true and more established Android or iOS? Many people simply aren't wanting to get an OS that their friends aren't using (and won't be able to recommend what they perceive as the "best" apps). If Windows 8 Modern UI is a failure will Microsoft quickly retrench to a more desktop (non-touch) friendly UI, or will they keep flogging a dead horse? If the cheapest Surface Pro device pushes $1000 many users will decide to buy a cheaper tablet in the $200 to $500 range or go ahead and get a "real" lap top. And if you get a real lap top, then why use dumbed down tile apps say for Facebook, when you could just as easily use the real web site? Finally (and I'll shut up), I don't think their model of wanting to eventually start charging for OS and MS Office updates on a monthly basis, so as to have a constant cash flow, is going to be popular with anyone. It will simply mean we users will be dealing with buggy "alpha" software all the time, not even "beta" level - jeez...
SMP
50%
50%
SMP,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2013 | 9:29:20 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
QUOTE
Windows 8 machines Soluto monitors, the report states that users with touchscreens launched 47% more Metro apps than those with traditional hardware, a conclusion that jives with an earlier report that claimed the OS's tablet adoption has outpaced its desktop and laptop adoption.

UNQUOTE

I don't think there is any discrepancy here.

Windows 8 users launch more Metro apps, because there aren't many Metro apps, and so the pretty much the only thing users can do is amuse themselves by pushing the Metro tiles to see what it does. They don't actually use the Metro apps like Windows 7 users do with Windows their apps.

I wasn't aware Windows 8 tablets outpaced Windows 8 desktop and laptop adoption. If this is actually true, then the only explanation for this would be that Windows 8 desktops and laptops can be downgraded to Windows 7 and are, but Windows 8 tablets can't be unfortunately, because they can't be used without touch support, and so aren't.
moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/24/2013 | 11:42:31 AM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
We didn't need studies for that. Just read the comments in the public beta forum and this outcome would have been clear before Win8 ships. And Microsoft missed a huge opportunity in not caring a bit about the free advice. Why even run public betas when Microsoft doesn't want to listen to what testers have to say? Now they feel that excessive arrogance in the pockets.
ANON1245867443530
50%
50%
ANON1245867443530,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/24/2013 | 4:08:59 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
That's what happens when you make an OS that's crippled by invisible controls.
Rigo123
50%
50%
Rigo123,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/24/2013 | 10:40:52 PM
re: Windows 8: Consumers Not Warming To Interface
Analogy to the operation of a motor vehicle: Microsoft wants us to operate our cars using our eye balls. However intriguing and through-provoking it may be, what's the point? There is nothing wrong with pedals and a steering wheel folks.


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.