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What I Didn't Say About Agile
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StevenJ13
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StevenJ13,
User Rank: Strategist
9/7/2013 | 5:12:18 AM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
GǣAgile is just another fad so that consultants can make money.Gǥ G Wrong. Just like in the other post you are completely misinformed. Consultants hate agile. Consultants make money on GǣscopeGǥ changes and contract modifications. That is the bread and butter, pure profit. Agile done right shouldnGt involve contract modifications.

Gǣthey all suffered from the "we can change anything at any time" thinkGǥ G That is bad management.

LetGs get into your last post:

GǣAgile is fine for apps that are very small in function and scope, that are intended to be thrown away within a yearGǥ G You mean how enterprise software should be built? Like how Amazon is built/ran? Or Office 365?

GǣSo for the dinky mobile apps that all are one trick ponies agile might work outGǥ G Oh like the dinky mobile apps with millions of enterprise users like Salesforce and Box?

GǣFor anything that amounts to a real application that is intended to be in use for years agile just brings more baggage and disadvantagesGǥ - Like everything at Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, Google, LinkedIn and the 1,000 other successful engineering firms?

The jury is out. Agile done right works, results in a better product and is used by those actually delivering software and at a rapid pace.
liverdonor
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liverdonor,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/3/2013 | 8:08:34 PM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
At our company, we've discovered that a hybrid approach (Agile, especially XP, internals with a level-4 CMM framework surrounding it) works really well.
Of course, we enforce it all the way up and down the company. This means, everyone from the CxOs down to the part-time plant-watering lady is in on the game.
CTO is discouraged from forcing mid-stream program changes because his reward per year depends on the success/failure of the teams under him. Directly. If something he does adversely affects the ability to meet dates, and he pushes a change on the product teams, that goes in his record and if that means we don't meet our dates, his bonus gets cut accordingly instead of the team below being punished.
Our CEO is very progressive in this regard. She's a former 'Softie with a LONG industry track record. So far, we've only missed product dates once since we formed 6 years ago, and we iterate major releases every year.
Implemented correctly, agile methods can work. You just have to be sane about it. Fanaticism and lack of adaptability generally leads to failure (maybe not right away, but eventually and catastrophically).
liverdonor
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liverdonor,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/3/2013 | 7:54:55 PM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
No one methodology is a panacea.
DevOps is, as far as it goes, a great approach and I've seen it work well, too.
Caveat - you have to have a flexible management structure to match. If your management isn't 100% onboard, it won't matter how good the coordination between your IT and Development teams are - you won't be able to release on time.
liverdonor
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liverdonor,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/3/2013 | 7:50:41 PM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
Um, no - Agile is the response of engineering teams fed up with being forced to spend months documenting a system, only to be made to change horses in mid-stream, then being beaten up by corporate management when (surprise, surprise) they missed their dates.
Agile works fine as long as a few things are understood:
a) just because you're agile, it doesn't mean you can arbitrarily change the fundamental nature of your project on a whim.
b) even though you don't need a copy of the Bible or War and Peace before you start building your system, you still have to have traceability from requirement through to tested and proven feature
c) you can't pretend that any methodology will magically fix everything.
d) if you don't have a solid, well-organized team structure, it doesn't matter what methodology you use - you'll end up with a herd of backstabbing cats at the end.
Keep these things in mind, don't go crazy down the rabbit-hole, reward entire teams for solid work as well as individual contributors, and try to have at least a few former engineers in management. Seen it work more than a dozen times with different companies over my career (which spans almost 4 decades).
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2013 | 12:33:11 AM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
Agile is just another fad so that consultants can make money. I've been on plenty agile projects and no matter how they are run and with methodology they use they all suffered from the "we can change anything at any time" think. Today we want this and tomorrow we want the opposite and that is perfectly fine, even when in two weeks we change our minds again. Agile is the cop out for utter indecision, lack of leadership, and hiding behind "the team".
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2013 | 1:20:35 AM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
Agile can't possibly work in every case. Waterfall before it didn't. But it brings not just a framework and a discipline to development but a system that builds in necessary feedback from the application's target users. The DevOps approach doesn't always work either, but if you start building the right approaches and disciplines into the respective staffs, it works much better than predecessor approaches. I don't think you can get to DevOps without building up an Agile state of mind.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2013 | 8:25:06 PM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
One wonders whether Agile had a better chance of working at VA, where former CIO Baker had an overarching IT authority that most other agency CIOs don't enjoy. That said, it's hard to imagine, given the pace of technology change, for committing to any IT project that doesn't incorporate an Agile approach.
Alex Kane Rudansky
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Alex Kane Rudansky,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2013 | 7:06:41 PM
re: What I Didn't Say About Agile
I agree that integrated testing is key. I'm curious how this works at the government level because of privacy issues -- who is the product tested on? Are there restrictions as to who can have access to the unfinished product for testing?


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