Comments
Keep The Web DRM-Free
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
10/4/2013 | 4:00:23 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
The PDF analogy is excellent. To many people outside tech, this is an abstraction - until suddenly they try to save a funny picture to post on Facebook and can't. It's all fun and games until someone loses a meme.
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
10/4/2013 | 4:51:28 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
Why does DRM need to be an W3C standard? Seems like there are plenty of proprietary techs for that purpose.
Haroldwolf
50%
50%
Haroldwolf,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/4/2013 | 4:55:22 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
DRM is what happens when you write legislation based on donor contributions. The legislation is almost exclusive in protecting the rights of the creator while ignoring the rights of a consumer who pays for the content.
midmachine
50%
50%
midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
10/4/2013 | 6:17:21 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
Absolutely correct
midmachine
50%
50%
midmachine,
User Rank: Strategist
10/4/2013 | 6:16:56 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
There is nothing wrong with content providers trying to monetize their content delivered on the web. That being said, the mechanism they are considering now is intrusive to all who use the web. I pay a subscription to Netflix so I can view the content. If I visit a news site (free) and stumble across a photo (which is more than likely available on hundreds of other news sites) and decide I want to save it/share it but can't due to DRM (which works horribly in every iteration I have come across) then the web will begin to whither like the music industry has. People won't put up with that, I know that I won't. If the content provider wants every inch of the page protected for monetizing purposes then charge a fee to view. Oh wait, that never worked. The web is a different animal from the local news stand. It empowers individuals to view/consume content their own way. If it doesn't work for your business model find something else, Don't force standards that break things simply because the platform you decide to use to make money (nothing wrong with making money) isn't meeting your needs.
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2013 | 6:49:36 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
The point is that what doesn't work, and what does work will become apparent. Companies are interested in maximizing sales and profits. If something doesn't work, they will try something else. If they DRM everything, and they lose customers, they will back down to the point at which the customers come back.

As far as the music industry goes, you are wrong. People did put up with it very happily. It isn't DRM per se that people see as a problem, but rather how content owners take advantage of their customers because they can do so.

Before Apple made a deal with the music industry, and released songs for $0.99, songs were being sold for $2.50 to $3.75 apiece. Customers wouldn't buy into those prices. And so piracy blossomed. But they did buy into the 99 cents a song, and turned Apple into the biggest music vendor in the world. This was with DRM. But Apple's DRM allowed people to do far more with their music than the older schemes, and that made a big difference as well.

B music is much easier to pirate because the file sized are vastly smaller. Most people still don't pirate movies and Tv shows because of the hassle.
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2013 | 6:13:54 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
This position is highly unrealistic. Content owners of video refuse to make that available without DRM. Most of that content is time sensitive, such as financial reports and interviews. Most of that is still being done in Flash, which is highly DRM'd.

Linux users have been complaining since the beginning that they can't get content. It's because Linux OS's, for the most part don't allow DRM to function.

We need to look at just how far this goes before condemning it completely. It's just not realistic to expect the web to host interesting content without some DRM. Look at YouTube. We see far more content there that is commercial because of the advertising Google has added., along with the DRM. That allows them to put copyrighted content into YouTube that couldn't have gotten there otherwise.

While some DRM can be a pain, to be sure, without it, we will be disappointed at the lack of content. That content will only be available in the owner's own web sites.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
10/8/2013 | 1:25:50 AM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
If there's an audience, the content will come, DRM or no. If companies want to lock their content in DRM, it's their prerogative to do so. But open Web standards should not be compromised for corporate convenience.
asksqn
50%
50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2013 | 9:34:11 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
DRM will kill the web in the same manner it kills everything else. The web thrives exactly because it's **not** preprogrammed/nannified like cable TV. People consume content on their own terms. To attempt to micromanage that equals the death of the internet and all manner of digital innovation.
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
10/7/2013 | 3:28:18 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
The web has been full of DRM since the beginning. Tis will change nothing other than to make it easier, and cheaper for companies and institutions. It will make proprietary software such as flash unnecessary.
asksqn
50%
50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2013 | 8:09:16 PM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
melgross:

Currently, DRM is found almost exclusively in digital content that is downloaded from behind a walled garden. It is not as ubiquitous as you evidently believe. But if the big content creators get their wish granted by the W3c, you can believe it will lockdown the web into 100% pay to play walled gardens that will exclude all but for the deep pocketed cos.
Drew Conry-Murray
50%
50%
Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2013 | 12:08:24 AM
re: Keep The Web DRM-Free
So far, no DRM systems have been able to tamp down piracy. I suspect this won't put an end to it, either. It may drive a few people who are casual piraters into the arms of for-pay providers, but that's about it.


The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.