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Cloud Migrations: Don't Forget About The Data
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J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Ninja
11/14/2013 | 9:19:50 PM
re: Cloud Migrations: Don't Forget About The Data
It is like any other project. You can look to see how fast and cheap you can do G㢠migrating the data, the application and the processes as they exist. Bingo G㢠youGăÍre Găúcloudified.Găą Or you can look to reengineer the processes, clean up and enhance the data, streamline and enhance the UX of the application. That takes much more effort energy and resources G㢠which is often why the existing legacy app is so crappy.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
11/14/2013 | 5:06:22 AM
re: Cloud Migrations: Don't Forget About The Data
I think the most difficult part is the evaluation and planning stage. First of all, you need to understand what you really want - do you want to migrate your legacy applications to cloud by spending considerable amount of effort without the guarantee that there is good ROI? Some of the applications are too old to be moved to the new computing platform - the business logic and the data are tightly coupled. Migrating such kind of application may be a nightmare. In this case, why not investigating the possibility about getting rid of some legacy application and engaging with the up-to-date ones? Of course this takes a lot of effort as well. But at least you can get a clean table in the end.:-)
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
11/9/2013 | 10:29:30 PM
re: Cloud Migrations: Don't Forget About The Data
Data migration is so important. More important than moving the application in my opinion. After all what good is an application with no data. Almost all data can be migrated from one system to another, regardless of the system. That's if you are moving to a new appication when moving to the cloud. It takes a lot of
planning. You need to look at your old data and see where it fits in the new
system.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Author
11/7/2013 | 9:46:57 PM
re: Cloud Migrations: Don't Forget About The Data
The migration problem does come in two parts. Thinking through those parts makes for a successful move to the cloud. It also sets up the possibility of migrating disaster recovery to the cloud. The data migration part then just has to be thought about in terms of very quick, if not instant, failover from one site to another.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
11/6/2013 | 5:42:26 PM
re: Cloud Migrations: Don't Forget About The Data
The money line here is "Moving your data from your legacy data stores to
the cloud is a unique opportunity for quality control, metadata tagging,
data dictionary, data lineage and other data management best practices" In other words, this is your chance to solve the data-quality problem, which shows up year after year as the number-one obstacle to success in our annual InformationWeek Business Intelligence and Analytics survey.


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