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How To Explain Hadoop To Non-Geeks
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sfreeves
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sfreeves,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/20/2013 | 11:46:12 AM
Good explaniation
I've been seeing a lot of artciles come through my inbox about Hadoop and unaware of what it is I found the video to hit the poinst to make me have a better understanding of what it is.  The visual aid certainly helps when you can actually hear see the person speaking if that was on paper I would still be lost.  Like any presentation, the message needs to be tailored for the audience.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2013 | 11:03:55 PM
Re: What, the CEO is five?
Fully agree with your point - for non-geeks we need to use layman word and there is no doubt on it. But we need to be careful with the way to present the topic - some people prefer presentation while others would like to see the video. All in all, for non-geeks and business oriented people, we need to deliver them the message that big data can help business growth by using real life example. Hard-selling technical stuff will not make your CEO buy in.:-)
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
11/19/2013 | 5:12:24 PM
Re: What, the CEO is five?
"she had a solid technology case for ripping out an important system, but got kicked out of the CEO's office multiple times"...sounds like a solid case for ripping out a disinterested executive.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
11/19/2013 | 3:39:17 PM
Hadoop can expand as needed
Forrester's Mike Gualtieri touches on a key point, the data sorting software is moved to the data locations on a cluster. What's also important is that Hadoop can expand to handle any amount of data and bring results on a big set as fast as a small one, thanks to its parallel processing. Just add servers to the cluster. Oops, the CEO just yawned. Quick, tell him and the CFO ithat it's much cheaper to use Hadoop than it is to use Oracle or DB2.

 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/19/2013 | 3:38:32 PM
Re: What, the CEO is five?
I wouldn't conflate keeping a presentation concise, free of jargon and very focused on the business benefit of a given tech (as opposed to how cool it is)with assuming that a CEO or CFO doesn't understand basic database concepts.
Michael Steinhart
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Michael Steinhart,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/19/2013 | 1:33:35 PM
Re: What, the CEO is five?
That's as may be, Lorna, but we've heard from many analytics experts that if you can't boil down a project pitch to 10 minutes or less, it doesn't even pay to approach the execs with it. Have you found things to be different in your experience?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/19/2013 | 12:19:07 PM
Re: What, the CEO is five?
I don't disagree with using plain English. But what line-of-business colleagues really want to hear is the language that relates to customer experience. I interviewed a senior IT leader earlier this year who told me she had a solid technology case for ripping out an important system, but got kicked out of the CEO's office multiple times -- until she made a short video that showed how the system related to what the customer experienced. Her CEO didn't just need plain English, he needed a visual. Adjust as needed for your culture.
BethSchultz
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BethSchultz,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/19/2013 | 11:34:53 AM
Re: What, the CEO is five?
You would certainly hope so, right?! 
anon0375810110
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anon0375810110,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/19/2013 | 10:03:54 AM
Bridging that gap to 2.0
The biggest challenge in this space will come down to keeping those explanations up to date. You Maybe just found the right balance in 'Explain it to me like I'm 5' and 'business use case' for your team, when bam, suddenly Hadoop goes 2.0 and the parameters they have understood have changed.

Not that big a deal - until you examine how fast that eco-system is evolving, it's not just a space dominated by Hadoop.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/19/2013 | 9:50:51 AM
What, the CEO is five?
"Moving data over a network "can be very, very slow, especially for really large data sets," Gualtieri added in the video. "Imagine if you're opening a really, really big file on your laptop, it takes a long, long time. It takes much longer than if it's a short, tiny file."

Honestly? If I were a CEO or LOB leader and my CIO walked in and said that to me, I'd ask whether she thinks she's addressing her fourth grader. Businesspeople are more IT savvy than technologists give them credit for.


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