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10 Most Misunderstood Facebook Privacy Facts
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Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 10:35:37 AM
Assume they can see it
These ambiguous settings are the reason I have backed off Facebook. It's become too public. Even when you lock down your privacy settings, some comments and photos can slip through as this article by Kristin shows. It's definitely a good rule of thumb to assume your grandma or employer can see your FB content. You can't go too wrong that way.
cwgservices
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cwgservices,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2013 | 10:33:25 AM
Contacts and Messages
To me, the two things that really need to be protected are private messages and my contact list.

Just because I import my contact list from gmail to see if some old friends are on Facebook, that doesn't mean I am willing to have Facebook, or worse yet some maverick app on Facebook, send mail to all my contacts. That is totally unacceptable.

And private messages need to be just that: private. When I 'message' someone, it's because I didn't want to post the information to the world. I have some concern that Facebook may decide to allow searching on these private conversations. I hope I'm wrong about that.
cwgservices
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cwgservices,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2013 | 10:25:49 AM
Apps are the worst
I really don't mind having my photos or my comments public. If I didn't want people to see them I wouldn't be putting them on Facebook.

Apps, on the other hand, are totally out of control.

I appreciate the tip on removing apps, but it seems to me the whole app infrastructure is designed to steal your friends list, your email contacts, maybe your firstborn if they can find a way to take it digitally. Apps are insidious, and it is way way way too hard to keep them out.

I'd like to see a lot more discussion on this aspect.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
11/21/2013 | 10:18:59 AM
Searches
Blocking yourself from appearing in searches was a bit of a false privacy anyway if the person was also on LinkedIn or Google+.  All you had to do was find someone they were connected to on one of those platforms, search for that person on Facebook, and then you could typically find their Facebook profile through that person's Friends list.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
11/21/2013 | 10:00:10 AM
Re: Simple answer
@Kristin Definitely, people really have to learn what they're getting themselves into when they use social media; otherwise, they'll have a very rude awakening down the road.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 9:42:38 AM
Re: Simple answer
That's a great point, and another reason why knowing your settings inside-out is essential if you're going to use Facebook.
Ariella
IW Pick
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
11/21/2013 | 9:35:39 AM
Re: Simple answer
@Kristin It's not just your grandmother you should be thinking of but any potential employer. One of my FB connections had a transplant and posts about her health regulary. When she was looking for a job, she wanted to know if she can hide her medical history so that it wouldn't count against her. Once it's out there on FB,  though, it's likely that an employer can find it, and the individual would not be able to prove that it was the health issue that made the person decide not to hire her.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 9:27:18 AM
Re: Simple answer
Lorna, that's a very good way to look at it. I've had several experts tell me this: "If you wouldn't want your grandmother to read it or see it, don't post it." Posting on Facebook and elsewhere really just comes down to common sense. It surprising how many people lack that.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 9:19:03 AM
Facebook Comments -- Know The Deal
"Your comments on others' photos, for example, may be public, depending on your friends' privacy settings." A lot of people don't realize this one. Facebook is turning into something you have to treat more like work e-mail: If you wouldn't want to see what you wrote in the newspaper, don't write it down.

 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 9:17:53 AM
Simple answer
Maybe I'm just old, but it seems like the answer is to just not post anything anywhere online -- including SnapChat -- if you wouldn't want the world to see it. There, done.
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