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IT Jobs Outlook: Salary, Training Spending Rise
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anon9927196658
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anon9927196658,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/4/2013 | 4:17:07 PM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
@Laurianne:

 

I respectfully disagree with your assertion that no CIO can build an effective team using a constantly rotating cast of specialists.  My observations are that CIO's should:

1.  Stop thinking long term.  Instead, think "Projects".  Today's business needs to be responsive to a constantly changing marketplace and technology that is 5 years old is outdated.

2.  Hire experts, not "generalists".  When you have a house built, you hire an expert for plumbing, another for electrical, and yet another for A/C.  You probably wouldn't want a team of "generalists" on the job.

3.  Test for specific skills when hiring.  If anything, expand requirements lists and test for those skills -- then be prepared to pay the specialists.

I suppose the fundamental disagreement between us is that you feel that CIO's need to build teams for the long-term and my experience (as a developer, manager, and business owner who has employed many developers) is that focusing tightly on requirements is the best way to maximize ROI in technology investments.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
12/4/2013 | 10:09:10 AM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
IT will always need some specialists, but no CIO can build an effective team using a constantly rotating cast of specialists. The idea of hiring generalists, with diverse project experience, who can morph and grow with the team must become a more popular part of IT culture, in my opinion.
Paul in Orlando
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Paul in Orlando,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/4/2013 | 9:29:22 AM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
It's not that hiring managers won't open their minds or that requirements lists have gotten out of hand; rather, the proliferation of competing technologies and platforms has increasingly segmented the market.   For example, in the software development arena, a strong Java developer making $125K/yr isn't likely to be worth that salary to a hiring manager seeking to recruit for a php project.  Likewise, that Java expert most likely won't pursue work in a more junior python developer capacity where their lesser expertise makes them less valuable.

It's simply a matter of supply and demand: if hiring managers demand specialists, they're going to have to pay more for them.  The good news is that a specialized technology expert can be ten times more productive than a technology generalist selected from a wider pool of generalist candidates.  That's why the smartest thing that both technologists and businesses, alike, can do is to invest in technology education and training.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
12/4/2013 | 9:25:47 AM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
A refreshing post from rradina. Thank you for weighing in. That his/her employer is a private company says something. Maybe it's because Dell and BMC have recently gone private, but I'm hearing a lot more these days about the virtues of working for a private company with a longer-term outlook.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2013 | 8:20:24 AM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
That is a very refreshing attitude to hear from any company leader.  I agree and try to promote this attitude as well but it often stops before it hits the executive level as they look at employee profiles like baseball cards.  I think as far as IT goes we are due for some type of apprentice, co-learning or career building style of path to bring up the skills that are lacking.  If you've got the aptitude but you don't have the skill yet I would rather have you on my team than having someone who has the skills on paper but doesn't get it or doesn't really want to be there.
samicksha
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samicksha,
User Rank: Strategist
12/4/2013 | 2:19:01 AM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
We are going through rapid transformations and new ideas, but parallel to same employee training is still lacking, i guess we need to match the pace of transformation with training employees accordingly. Yes Data science is emerging and asking more engineers but lack of skill still hold employees to get through interview.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
12/3/2013 | 8:49:46 PM
Re: IT Skills Shortage
I recently converted from a contractor to an employee largely based on a motivational speech made by an IT VP.  He said they look for certain natural abilities in their IT employees rather than a specific technology skills. He claimed that someone with the right aptitude and drive can always be trained with new technical skills.  After nearly 30 years of maintaining the right skills to make sure I was "marketable", his words felt like salvation.  Finally, an organization that values employees and understands natural ability and aptitude are far more important than specific years of experience with this or that technology du jour.

Naturally I feel compelled to mention that this is NOT a publicly traded company that is forced to answer to those with limited patience and who probably leave a football game when their team isn't leading at the end of the first quarter!
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
12/3/2013 | 3:37:12 PM
IT Skills Shortage
20% of the CIOs said skills shortage keeps them up at night? That is sure to spur some debate among IT pros who are job hunting. Is there really a skills shortage?

Well, we know data science pros are in demand, certainly. But some companies still are crying shortage -- but, IT job hunters say, the hiring managers won't open their minds to a wide pool of candidates. Have the requirements lists gotten out of hand?
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/3/2013 | 3:14:19 PM
Meeting with CEO/CFO
Half of the CIOs said they meet with the CEO or CFO weekly, and that those interactions were "very positive" or "highly positive." Any CIOs want to weigh in here? Does the same ring true in your organization?


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