Comments
Target Thinks Retail About Healthcare
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
1/29/2014 | 11:47:51 AM
Bad timing
The timing of this push is clearly not ideal. Target losing control of a credit card number is one thing. Medical records being hacked is quite another. What incentive do consumers have to trust retailers with this information?
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/29/2014 | 3:43:13 PM
Re: Bad timing
You might think that. On the other hand, if the impulse buy for healthcare is a part of the strategy, you're talking about people who are shopping in Target stores, today, despite all the bad publicity as the result of the security breach. I'm sure Target is seeing a business impact on this part of their business like the rest of it -- but their stores are hardly empty. Most consumers won't care about the data breach until the day they feel some consequence from it, like some attack on their identity or their bank account.
Brian Bartlett
50%
50%
Brian Bartlett,
User Rank: Strategist
1/29/2014 | 4:07:23 PM
Re: Bad timing
I do a lot of security work and I keep track of breaches as a matter of course. There hasn't been an organization of any type, let alone retail, that has as a group stopped breaches cold. Zip, nada, none. I for one was part of the group of 22 million vets whose records were lost on an unencrypted laptop. The government can't get it right either. So holding Target up as a bad actor is completely missing the point.
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/29/2014 | 5:15:09 PM
Re: Bad timing
The bad timing was really the speech, not the retail healthcare initiative (which has been going on for a while).

Put yourself in the position of Dr. Riff, having agreed to speak at this event probably months ago and now going on stage probably feeling like he had a "kick me" sign on his back. Actually, nobody gave him a hard time over the breach because they knew that wasn't his department.

Judging from the number of other people I heard citing his talk, he and his team have done some legitimately innovative things with retail healthcare and the application of analytics to doing it more effectively. It would be a shame to write that off because of an IT screwup in another part of the company.
Brian Bartlett
50%
50%
Brian Bartlett,
User Rank: Strategist
1/29/2014 | 6:57:02 PM
Re: Bad timing
I've experienced that sinking, red-faced embarrassment before even starting into a presentation before. I think we all have. Back on-point, I wish him well on the endeavor. Having applied predictive analytics to the "retail side" myself, trying to shake out a good model is hard. Especially when the very system that is being modeled is under flux as you change your processes. [I did such work for a home-based primary-care unit sometime back.] I consider it fun, but I've always had a rather warped view of fun.
asksqn
50%
50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2014 | 4:33:20 PM
Oh HIPAA wherefore art thou?
Healthcare could learn a lot from retail?  LOL you mean like how **not** to secure data and have nonexistent security and otherwise not care about breaches? 


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 7, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program!
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.