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Microsoft's Windows Strategy Gets Muddy
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SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2014 | 6:11:49 AM
Re: Microsoft's Windows Strategy Gets Muddy
@ SaneIT, I share your opinion that Microsoft seems to be heading in the right direction. Bringing the same UI to every platform and integrating them smoothly could work for Microsoft in the not-so-long run. Offering Android apps in Windows is like inviting the wolf to their home to me. It will leave them seriously vulnerable.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2014 | 5:23:40 AM
Re: Microsoft's Windows Strategy Gets Muddy
@ J_Brandt, I agree that there can be hardly anything in apps world which can be called "One-size-fits-all". Display, processor and other specifications on different devices will certainly affect the performance of apps on different devices. It is just like stretching a picture on larger display which was actually made for a shorter display. You may stretch it to whatever lengths you want to but you can never get the same quality.

 

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/18/2014 | 12:23:08 AM
Should
If Microsoft was able to successfully attract game developers to develop exclusive hits for the XBox, they should be able to do the same with app developers for Win8.

Keyword: should
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
2/14/2014 | 1:29:44 PM
Re: I find this disconcerting
I think that Microsoft does indeed need to put all options on the table. They have problems with their app ecosystem.

Specifically, developers don't produce a voluminous amount of software for Microsoft's app marketplace.

That's why the company is thinking about letting Android developers in - they want increased exposure. 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
2/14/2014 | 1:27:00 PM
Re: HTML5 vs App Stores
You are right on. The two big differences between phone and tablet/laptop is screen size and processing power. Over time, processing power will increase on phone but not size. Well, unless some kind of holographic projection technology becomes the norm anyway.

With HTML5 and using Model-View-Controller architecture, you can share a lot of code between these form factors. HTML5 is getting better at offline support and using native access (no browser to wrap the app). But you have to design your app much different for a small screen versus a larger screen, if you truly want the best experience in each world.

If these middleware tools get better at generating the proper Views needed for each form factor, maybe we'll get where we can write one code base. But we are not close to that yet. It's a facsinating area to watch, these small mobile screens have caused as much disruption in the development process since GUI replaced CUI. What you learned you have to learn all over again.
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
2/14/2014 | 10:20:09 AM
Re: I find this disconcerting
I think Microsoft's problem is that it has too much money. It can afford to fight a long, losing battle on the mobile front by trying to make Windows a robust competitor for phones and tablets. But consumers have spoken, and they just aren't interested.
J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Ninja
2/14/2014 | 10:17:33 AM
HTML5 vs App Stores
I don't see how a combined store or app for the two OSes can work.  You end up making compromises that ultimately destroy the real power of the application (or you make them huge and bloated they neither fit nor run on the average device/machine).  From that perspective, pushing the web, HTML 5 and more makes more sense.  This is where we were headed before the success of  the iPhone and the App Store.  Maybe we can return there, but its doubtful.  Universally running applications are not in Apple, Google or Microsoft's "best" interest.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
2/14/2014 | 8:58:47 AM
Re: I find this disconcerting
I run Bluestacks on my Windows tablet, but honestly I wish it didn't have to be that way.  I like the direction that Microsoft is going with bringing the same UI to every platform and mixing Android into the offerings seems like they are admitting defeat.  I would rather see them make development for the Win 8 platforms easier or more attractive.   I don't think Android is going away but that doesn't mean Microsoft can't be competitive. 
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/14/2014 | 8:33:25 AM
Android Apps on Windows Phone
I've read a number of interpretations of what "Android Apps on Windows Phone" means.  The most rational one is to enable Android application developers to use some kind of Microsoft cloud service that compiles their existing Android source code into a package suitable for installation on WinPhone 8 and subsequent submission to the Windows Store.

If this is what it means and the "packaged" Android app works well on WP8, seems like an excellent idea.  Both phones have the similar buttons so this shouldn't be trying to breed a cat with a fish.
anon7359286176
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anon7359286176,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/14/2014 | 1:10:32 AM
Re: I find this disconcerting
By making Nadella the CEO, MS sent a signal that the future of MS is in cloud based applications.

Successful transition to that future would first mean making MS-Office for Android. That way existing grip of MS-Office can be safeguarded for the future.

The other transition would be to offer Skype - essentially muddying Android's relations with Telcos.

Or, moving Skype first and seeing how it goes with Android and Telcos before moving MS-Office ;-)

Offering Visual Studio for Android may be a smash hit. However, there isn't much money to make there.

Everything else on the consumer side except Xbox will anyway die a natural death.
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