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Be Careful What You Wish For

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Be Careful What You Wish For
2. Today's Top Story
    - Wi-Fi Startup Gets Funding From Google, Skype
    Related Stories:
    - Google Accuses Ricoh Unit, BMW Of Search Results-Stuffing
    - Amazon.com Reportedly Considering Ad Network
3. Breaking News
    - NEC To Roll Out Dual-Core Fault-Tolerant Servers
    - IBM, Freescale Map Future Of Power Processor After Apple
    - Symantec To Defend Itself Against Microsoft In Consumer Security Market
    - BizTalk Adds Connectivity To PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, And Siebel
    - Wikis At Work
    - iMac Model No Longer For Sale
    - IBM Tips Power6 Processor Architecture
    - Report: ISP Filters Forcing Decline in Spam
    - L.A. Cops Fight Car Chases With GPS Devices
    - Opera Pushes BitTorrent, Widgets In 9.0 Preview
    - CipherTrust Service Warns Corporations Of Brand Damage
4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web
    - On Capitol Hill, Playing WikiPolitics
    - Yahoo, AOL To Charge Some E-Mail Senders
    - Andrew Kantor's CyberSpeak--Here's Hoping Congress Keeps The Pipes Open
5. In Depth: Patents: Winners and Losers
    - Microsoft Patent Loss Translates Into User Pain
    - Apple Files For Touch-Sensitive Patent
    - Hitachi Claims Paper-Thin RFID Chip
    - Patent Office To Re-Examine Controversial Forgent Patent
6. Voice Of Authority
    - IT Confidential: Scorecard Needed To Tell Rights From Wrongs
7. White Papers
    - Single Sign-on: Putting An End To The Password-Management Nightmare
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Never confuse movement with action." -- Ernest Hemingway



1. Editor's Note: Be Careful What You Wish For

Both my colleague Mitch Wagner and I have been following the Chinese censorship issue that has caught Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, and Cisco like deer in the headlights and triggered a firestorm of international criticism. If my E-mail and responses to our blog are anything to go by, so have readers--with a mix of cynicism, business practicality, and a longing idealism.

I think everyone recognizes that if you decide to do business in countries like China, which is desperately and pathetically trying to have it both ways--move their country into the Internet age without letting any unsanctioned ideas slip in (good luck, fellahs)--you have to abide by the laws of that country, no matter how repressive.

And there's the argument that if they don't move now to get in on the ground level of this gargantuan consumer market (and up-and-coming outsourcing destination, no doubt--China builds everything else for the West--why not software?), then they'll be hurting their business prospects for the future.

There's also the ever-popular adage that businesses are in the business of making money, not fostering cultural revolutions or overthrowing governments (though history might quibble with that one a bit).

It's not hard to see the logic of each argument. All are true--to a point.

And Mitch is sort of right to laud Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, and Cisco, first, for being grown up enough to get out there and explain their actions, and second, for starting to taking some steps to minimize the impact of assisting the Chinese government.

And it was good to see Microsoft chairman Bill Gates call for an international dialogue on the issue, with the goal of creating "guidelines."

But let's not get too excited. There are many sides to this issue, and many motivations, which I explore in my blog entry in more detail. At the end of the day though, it's imperative that the two reluctant players here--the four companies, and the government--stop ducking one another and the issue and get talking. For starters, they can tackle an intriguing proposition from Google's senior counsel: Treat censorship as a barrier to trade.

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Wi-Fi Startup Gets Funding From Google, Skype
Fon, of Spain, got $21.7 million in investor funding from Google, Skype, and other investors. Fon plans to create a global network of a million shared Wi-Fi hot-spots by 2010, using the same download, install, and share model that created the Skype network.

Related Stories:

Google Accuses Ricoh Unit, BMW Of Search Results-Stuffing
BMW and Ricoh used a technique commonly referred to as "cloaking," where a Web site presents different pages to search engine bots than it displays to visitors, a senior engineer for Google said in his blog.

Amazon.com Reportedly Considering Ad Network
Blogger Chris Beasley says Amazon.com plans to test a program similar to Google's AdSense, which is a network of Web sites that display links to Google advertisers.


3. Breaking News

NEC To Roll Out Dual-Core Fault-Tolerant Servers
The three fault-tolerant servers will use new Xeon processors, including one server that features a 2.8-GHz dual-core system.

IBM, Freescale Map Future Of Power Processor After Apple
The two vendors ships tens of millions of the chips a year and say business will improve now that they don't have to devote resources to slow-selling Apple PCs.

Symantec To Defend Itself Against Microsoft In Consumer Security Market
New software code-named Genesis will deliver software as a service, including antivirus, anti-spyware, anti-spam, and firewall.

BizTalk Adds Connectivity To PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, And Siebel
Microsoft is wooing customers by taking advantage of Oracle's delays coming out with Fusion. Oracle bought PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, and Siebel last year.

Wikis At Work
Wikis can bring a sense of involvement and innovation to an organization--if they're implemented wisely. Here's how Nokia, the Canadian Meteorological Center, and Angel.com are putting wikis to work.

iMac Model No Longer For Sale
The 17-inch iMac G5, which last week was still selling for $1,299, has disappeared from the Apple Web site and both the U.S. and U.K. versions of its online store.

IBM Tips Power6 Processor Architecture
At a technical conference this week, IBM gave some details of its upcoming Power6 chip architecture for servers. It's a 65-nanometer processor that operates in excess of 4 GHz.

Report: ISP Filters Forcing Decline In Spam
Spam volume will decrease 13% annually through 2010, predicts Jupiter Research.

L.A. Cops Fight Car Chases With GPS Devices
Los Angeles police will propel a GPS device onto a fleeing car. The device will stick to the car and track its location. It's hoped that will reduce dangerous high-speed chases.

Opera Pushes BitTorrent, Widgets In 9.0 Preview
The Technical Preview will post early today, Oslo time, on a new Opera Labs Web site, an Opera spokesman said.

CipherTrust Service Warns Corporations Of Brand Damage
The new Radar 360 service sniffs out scams, typically phishing attacks, that pose as messages from a company.

All our latest news

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'News You Can Use'

Paul Kapustka With 'VoIP Line'
The latest news in the VoIP sector.

Alex Wolfe With 'Keep Your Searches Private'
Five easy things you can do to keep your Web searches private.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Linux: Service And Support
Is Linux really a low-cost alternative to other operating systems? Learn how more than 300 business-technology professionals are planning to use Linux in their IT infrastructure in this recent InformationWeek Research report Linux: The Impact Of Service And Support. Use this report to benchmark your company's initiatives for Linux.

How Does China's Information Security Measure up?
We invite you to compare the similarities and differences in the security practices and experiences of U.S. and Chinese companies with an online security tool from InformationWeek and Accenture, a management-consulting and technology-services company.

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4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

On Capitol Hill, Playing WikiPolitics (Washington Post)
Partisanship tests Web site's policies.

Yahoo, AOL To Charge Some E-Mail Senders (AP)
Two of the world's biggest E-mail account providers, Yahoo and America Online, plan to introduce a service that would charge senders a fee to route their E-mail directly to a user's mailbox without first passing through junk mail filters, representatives of both companies said Sunday.

Andrew Kantor's CyberSpeak--Here's Hoping Congress Keeps The Pipes Open (USA Today)
As Congress gets rolling in its next session, there's an interesting debate it's going to have about the future of high-speed Internet. It's one that will affect you and your wallet directly, and one that has some interesting perspectives that cry out for discussion. The issue is network neutrality.


5. In Depth: Patents: Winners and Losers

Microsoft Patent Loss Translates Into User Pain
One in four businesses will have to update Microsoft Office because the developer lost a patent lawsuit, an asset-management company said. The patent was awarded for a way of linking spreadsheet data among multiple Microsoft programs.

Apple Files For Touch-Sensitive Patent
Could iPod, iMac, iBook, MacBook, and PowerBook lovers see touch-pad capabilities in time for the 2006 holiday season? Apple isn't saying.

Hitachi Claims Paper-Thin RFID Chip
The technology can be used as an intelligent watermark, Hitachi says; the company is due to present more details at an IEEE conference this week.

Patent Office To Re-Examine Controversial Forgent Patent
About 30 companies that Forgent has sued in federal court for alleged patent infringement are challenging the company's claims. Forgent's data-image-compression technology is part of the widely used JPEG standard for digitized still images.


6. Voice Of Authority

IT Confidential: Scorecard Needed To Tell Rights From Wrongs
Determining right from wrong is easy, right? Wrong! There are more permutations of that relationship than patches on a Windows server. One permutation goes like this: You can do the right thing for the wrong reason, or the wrong thing for the right reason. And that's not even counting good or bad. It's a riddle wrapped in an enigma, deep-fried in self-interest, and served on a bed of rationalization. John Soat looks at how this might apply to the technology industry.


7. White Papers

Single Sign-on: Putting An End To The Password-Management Nightmare
Password protection is inherently insecure, leaving your network vulnerable to attack. In this informative paper you'll learn how single-sign-on solutions can help assure heightened security and compliance, reduce administrative complexity and costs, and improve the end-user experience.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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