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Data Management // Big Data Analytics
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10/30/2015
10:06 AM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
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14 Creepy Ways To Use Big Data

The amount of data being collected about people, companies, and governments is unprecedented. What can be done with that data is downright frightening. From bedrooms to boardrooms, from Wall Street to Main Street, the ground is shifting in ways that only the most cyber-savvy can anticipate. We reveal the creepy ways to use data now and in the near future.
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(Image: Alexas_Fotos via Pixabay)

(Image: Alexas_Fotos via Pixabay)

Each day, 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created. As more sensors find their way into everything from smartphones to household appliances, cars, and entire cities, it's possible to gain unprecedented insight into the behaviors, motivations, actions, and plans of individuals and organizations.

"Privacy is gone," said Walter O'Brien, founder and CEO of Scorpion Computer Services, the real-life company (with a real live person) upon which the CBS TV series Scorpion is based. "If it's online, it's possible to get at it."

Information is in high demand because it represents power and money. People and organizations are willing pay handsomely for information, whether it's a data feed, a trade secret, IP, credit card numbers, email addresses, passwords, or personal identities. "So much information that consumers deem personal is, in fact, quite readily accessible," said Yoram Golandsky, CEO of cyber-risk consultancy and solution provider CybeRisk Security Solutions, in an interview. "There isn't one repository that can't be broken into. Eventually we find a way in."

Danny Rogers, co-founder and CEO of information security company Terbium Labs estimates that 20% of the US population has been affected by a data breach, based on some rough sampling he did. When searching for a particular compromised email address on the Dark Web, Rogers discovered it had been leaked via 50 different sources.

[ Having trouble making sense of disparate data? Read Data Visualizations: 11 Ways To Bring Analytics To Life. ]

"It's a massive problem. Personal information is being disseminated far and wide. I don't think people appreciate how far and wide," said Rogers, in an interview. "It's getting to the point where you have to assume your data is not safe with anybody."

While the warnings may sound alarmist or even paranoid, consider the sources: A world-class hacker and security expert, another sought-after security expert, and a Dark Web expert. Happy Halloween, kids. Here are 14 scary examples of what can be done with data.

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include ... View Full Bio

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tomskaczmarek
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tomskaczmarek,
User Rank: Strategist
12/2/2015 | 10:03:45 AM
Symposium on the Ethics of Big Data
Marquette University is sponsoring an inter-disciplinary symposium on the Ethics of Big Data. The event is open to all who are interested. See http://www.marquette.edu/mscs/ethics-of-big-data-symposium.shtml

If you are interested please consider our invitation or pass this information along to colleagues.
pfretty494
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pfretty494,
User Rank: Moderator
11/23/2015 | 1:30:23 PM
Need for Governance
I often think the fear of the creepy uses that could leave a customer open to a security issue stand in the way of organizations pushing forward with big data initiatives. In reality, it just shines a light on the need for governance. Peter Fretty, IDG blogger for SAS
KevinPetrieTech
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KevinPetrieTech,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/2/2015 | 6:21:14 AM
Empowering customers with big data
Interesting article - privacy is definitely on the ropes.  There are promising signs of an emerging trend - the use of data to empower customers.  Innovative enterprises in industries such as insurance are starting to make their customers transparent, respectful offers to trade their personal information in exchange for value.  Drivers that agree to have their cars tracked will be rewarded for safe behavior with lower insurance rates.  Similarly, health insurance customers with trackable FitBit devices will get discounts for walking more steps each day.  Companies that treat individuals like savvy partners rather than unwitting prey might be more successul in coming years.

@KevinPetrieTech

www.attunity.com
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2015 | 4:41:13 PM
Re: Credit-Worthy
"I bought a vehicle recently and the on the same day I got message from a retailer about the new parts available for that vehicle. I was surprised to see that."

@shamika: As per the law, any company can only send you advertisement on your text if you have given them your consent either through a signed approval or electronically. In the absence of that, it will be considered spam and the company can be held liable for spamming.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2015 | 4:36:03 PM
Protect yourself first
"The amount of information we can find on a person from Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and blog postings [is significant], and that's without leaving the office,"

I think that says a lot about how the information is leaked not by the efforts from the hackers but by the stupidity of most people. In the physical world counterpart, if you leave your door ajar, there will be people who'll peek inside and you can't really call them bad people. Same goes for the e-world - protect your own stuff before you blame others.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 8:42:25 PM
Re: Credit-Worthy
It has become really difficult to be aware from retailers. I bought a vehicle recently and the on the same day I got message from a retailer about the new parts available for that vehicle. I was surprised to see that.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 8:40:08 PM
Credit-Worthy
This is interesting and seems to be a good way of identifying nonpayment of card. What sort decision they take base on marital status, age. I believe they check the spending and payment habits.
shamika
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50%
shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 8:30:16 PM
Data security
Data security has become critical issue. Therefore it is important to have necessary controls when it comes to handling data.
6 Tools to Protect Big Data
6 Tools to Protect Big Data
Most IT teams have their conventional databases covered in terms of security and business continuity. But as we enter the era of big data, Hadoop, and NoSQL, protection schemes need to evolve. In fact, big data could drive the next big security strategy shift.
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