Mobile // Mobile Devices
Commentary
8/8/2014
12:00 AM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Bring The Office To The Beach: Yea Or Nay?

When you go on vacation, do you actually go on vacation, or does work tag along? Has our culture made it impossible to really get away?

As I prepare for a vacation with my family, I plan to have my smartphone in tow, and I’m sure I’m going to check in with the office. It’s hard not to.

For one, there’s the sheer volume of e-mail to read and projects to keep up with. I can hear them piling up already, and I haven’t even left the office yet.

If I let days go by without pruning my inbox, I’ll come back to a teetering haystack of messages and tasks, and then spend hours sifting for needles and days playing catch-up.

For another, there’s the low-grade anxiety that permeates our modern economy. Am I working hard enough? Will my employer frown on me taking this time away? Will my colleagues think less of me?

When you combine this anxiety with the Puritan work ethic that’s ingrained in our culture, it creates a kind of toxic reaction--work isn’t just a part of our lives, it’s become our lives.

The imperative to work longer and harder is everywhere. For instance, it’s hard to read a profile of a industry titan or startup whiz without the obligatory paean to the insane number of hours they put in. In some sub-cultures, like finance and tech, the amount of hours worked takes on a moral or macho quality.

And even in the less-exalted echelons of the professional classes, chit-chat about the weather has been tossed aside in favor of the humbe-brag about how insanely busy we are.

These factors make it difficult to disengage from the office, especially when it’s so easy to bring the office with you wherever you go. And that’s a problem, because there’s a growing body of evidence that finds more work doesn’t necessarily equal better productivity.

I’m mindful of the value of disconnecting, and I’m going to do my best to trust that my talented and capable coworkers can muddle along without me (though only for a few days!). I’ll let the out-of-office message serve as a temporary shield, deflecting or delaying tasks while I play in the sand with my kids and pour wine for my wife.

I know I’ll be tempted to peek at my e-mail, because it’s hard to let go. But I also know the work will still be there when I get back, and it’s perfectly capable of taking care of itself for a little while.

If you’re taking, or have taken, a vacation this year, are you going to leave the office behind? Does your employer recognize the benefits of letting you rest and recharge? Or will the work come with you? And even if it didn’t have to, do you think you could let it go?

Drew is formerly editor of Network Computing and currently director of content and community for Interop. View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
jastroff
50%
50%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 6:49:09 PM
Re: Incremental value of being disconnected
I wonder how the company deals with important business/client requests/customer service if they delete the emails that might contain the information?

 

>> Just saw this online: The German automaker Daimler is putting in a system to automatically delete messages that are sent to people who are on vacation: 
Drew Conry-Murray
100%
0%
Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 2:35:06 PM
Re: Incremental value of being disconnected
Just saw this online: The German automaker Daimler is putting in a system to automatically delete messages that are sent to people who are on vacation: http://www.engadget.com/2014/08/17/daimler-deletes-out-of-office-email/

That's a bold step! Not sure if it's the right one, but it's certainly bold. I also wonder if it applies to top executives.
Shane M. O'Neill
50%
50%
Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
8/18/2014 | 11:28:52 AM
Re: Incremental value of being disconnected
"We have to remember businesses all ran for centuries without access to their employees all the time."

Excellent point. You have to ask yourself how much of these always-on connections are really necessary. Or are you just checking in on them because you can?
Drew Conry-Murray
50%
50%
Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 11:21:45 AM
Re: Allowing yourself to recharge
A quick update. I got back from a very restful and fun week, and I didn't check my e-mail at all. This was a first for me! I do think it's important to disconnect and recharge, and now I'm ready to go full steam ahead. I think one of the reasons I could go off the work grid is because of the great team at the office who picked up the slack--thanks everybody! And Shane, I think you're right: I'll work better because of the opportunity to really take time away.
impactnow
50%
50%
impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 4:42:00 PM
Incremental value of being disconnected
I did just return from a vacation in July and while I did check email a few times I did not interrupt any of my vacation activities to do so. I checked in at off times or when waiting in line etc. Being disconnected allows me to be more creative long term and avoid the burnout cycle. We have to remember businesses all ran for centuries without access to their employees all the time.
Shane M. O'Neill
50%
50%
Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
8/11/2014 | 11:16:03 AM
Allowing yourself to recharge
I just returned from a week's vacation so this post hits home. i experienced every thought and feeling Andrew lays out here. He's right, these days it's difficult to just let go. Work can be all-consuming and it's so accessible, so it's no easy task to shut the door for awhile. But if you have a good and trustworthy team, you can do it. Should do it. And try not to look at email. (Ok, maybe a mid-week check and another check the day before returning).  I try to think of a week off as a time of rest but also a recharging. I'll do better work later because of it.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 9:31:47 AM
Re: Don't worry about work!
I suffer from this and I know several other people who do as well.  We have become an industry of always on, always available professionals.  I can't say that I've had an honest vacation from work in almost 20 years.  Before cell phones it was a pager and code 911 entered after a phone number.  One thing that I've started to consider is if labor laws will be changed to address this.  If you look at the hours I'm "on", checking and responding to messages or working on little things outside of my office hours the work/life line gets very blurry.  With more physical jobs this type of thing wouldn't fly but it isn't given much thought with knowledge workers.
jjessup570
50%
50%
jjessup570,
User Rank: Author
8/8/2014 | 6:19:53 PM
Don't worry about work!
Drew, your post raises some very important questions about work / life balance. Or vacation / work balance! I miss the days of pre-Blackberry vacations. I do agree with you that unless we have a chance to recharge we won't be nearly as productive in the long term. And your kids grow up too soon! So get down in the sad and leave your phone behind. We'll muddle through without you!!!
Building A Mobile Business Mindset
Building A Mobile Business Mindset
Among 688 respondents, 46% have deployed mobile apps, with an additional 24% planning to in the next year. Soon all apps will look like mobile apps and it's past time for those with no plans to get cracking.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Nov. 10, 2014
Just 30% of respondents to our new survey say their companies are very or extremely effective at identifying critical data and analyzing it to make decisions, down from 42% in 2013. What gives?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.