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8 Reasons IT Pros Hate The Cloud

We sense a simmering level of vitriol whenever we speak with IT professionals about the cloud in our daily conversations, at industry conferences, and in other settings. Here's why.
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(Image: Alois Wonasheutz via Pixabay)

Hate is a powerful word. Yet, it accurately describes how IT professionals feel about cloud computing. They're not screaming it from the rooftops, or starting protests in social media, but there's a quiet level of vitriol we hear whenever we speak with IT professionals about the cloud in our daily conversations, at industry conferences, and in other settings.

Yes, cloud computing can cut costs (if done properly). Yes, cloud computing can improve economies of scale. And yes, cloud computing can streamline IT processes. Despite these and other clear-cut benefits, there are many infrastructure administrators who find enough problems with cloud computing that they end up loathing the whole concept altogether.

Why do IT pros hate the cloud? Some find it hard to believe that cloud computing is only continuing to gain popularity. Some object to the purely technical issues that pose problems for IT pros who are used to maintaining data and applications in-house. They feel the cloud creates more work for them. Oftentimes, the issue is rooted in the difficulty that IT admins are having transitioning to new roles. With cloud-based infrastructure, platforms, or software, hands-on technical skills aren't needed as much as they once were in IT. Instead, many enterprises seek professionals who can act as systems architects, bringing a high-level vision of end-to-end infrastructure.

With time, these and other pet peeves will be resolved. For now, though, cloud hatred is a serious problem. So serious, in fact, that it can distort the roadmap for many IT organizations. If the cloud is ignored, it can cost businesses time, money, and productivity. While some IT shops can get away with avoiding anything cloud-related today, this won't be an option for most of us in the future.

That's why it's so important to air these concerns and discuss them now. In all likelihood, the cloud is here to stay, so it's important that we identify what's causing the hate, so it can be addressed and we can all move forward. Once you've reviewed this airing of the grievances, let us know how you feel about the cloud. Have you found workarounds to lessen the pain caused by cloud implementations? Have we missed anything about cloud computing that you simply cannot stand? Tell us all about it in the comments section below.

Andrew has well over a decade of enterprise networking under his belt through his consulting practice, which specializes in enterprise network architectures and datacenter build-outs and prior experience at organizations such as State Farm Insurance, United Airlines and the ... View Full Bio

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KerryLB303
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KerryLB303,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/16/2015 | 1:34:27 PM
Re: A provider's perpsective
Sorry if this isn't placed correctly, but I'm stuck between too tired to focus and a need to vent that's been brewing for years now.  Knowing I'm not at my best, I'll limit my comments to one specific part: lack of search limiters.

 

Cloud's nice if you're not quite sure what you're looking for (especially if you don't know the proper spelling or term).  But once you start getting a clue, it would be nice if boolean operators like NOT or the find-specific-string operation actually worked!  It's like you're looking for someone, and every answer is "Oh, yeah, that's John Smith from New York".  Not exactly a limiting factor (even if someone bothers to say whether they mean the state or the city.)  Try and tell Google "John Smith" NOT city, and most of the results tend to actually include the word CITY.  (Not to mention, practically everyone named John OR Smith... OR Jon, OR Smythe, OR Schmidt...)

 

Does anyone still do comparisons of how fast different searches compare to each other?  If so, they ought to make sure to include not just how long it takes for the software to produce a list of results -- they need to wait until the human using the search decides they've found the specific answer they wanted!
The IT Pro
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The IT Pro,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/1/2015 | 5:22:22 PM
Re: A provider's perpsective
Best reply on this topic. The cloud enables Org's to focus on core competences with limited resources that are better utilized elsewhere. The cloud makes financial, technical, and strategic sense in numerous areas and it is here to stay. Legacy models are clearly outdated, slow to adopt to a real time customer experience (internal & external), and keep control with the few IT professionals who can navigate the overly complex platforms that are not suited for the agile economy of today. Adapt or die...
_jaduenas
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_jaduenas,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/3/2015 | 2:38:31 AM
Birthing Pains
I do get where this is coming from, personally my main issue with The Cloud is the lack of control over it because of its very nature. However, issues in this particular article are notable but I think the main issue is the feeling of comfort and security transitioning into this new system. Great article and thank you for your insights! :)
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2015 | 3:17:10 PM
Re: It's simple Econ 101
@asksqn    You are telling it like it is !   I agree completely.  Everything else is marketing.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2015 | 3:06:05 PM
It's simple Econ 101
IT despises the cloud simply because no one who spends thousands of dollars becoming certified for this or that alphabet soup tech cert wants to be reduced to tech support that can be just as easily and effectively performed by employees who didn't spend the money on tech certs.  Suddenly, that $35.00/hr. gig you secured for obtaining a CISSP has been reduced to $12.50/hr. courtesy of the cloud.  And that's only IF your job hasn't been outsourced to an imported H1B Visa holder or performed remotely by serfs in Bangladesh hired by your employer. 
ClassC
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ClassC,
User Rank: Moderator
5/29/2015 | 12:28:03 PM
Re: The Problem is "Public" Cloud for business
@Thomas   Good point.  My only concern is that this data be fully vented and cleared.  I don't see that as the case more often than not.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2015 | 2:16:58 PM
Re: The other side of Cloud
>>...but to me, the infrastructure is starting to look and feel more like a utility as opposed to something vastly unique from one company to the next.

Andrew, that is an interesting comment to make. Could you explain your definition of "infrastructure"? Surely you aren't getting into o/s, databases and applications on that comment are you? Even within the Windows camp, are you Win 2003, Win 2008 or Win 2012? Not every application runs on every version?

And there are still a few of us (thousands) who use things like IBM servers and databases for our mission critical ERP systems. To say this world is now like electricity is pushing it unless I'm missing your definition of infrasturucture.
mdortch570
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mdortch570,
User Rank: Strategist
5/27/2015 | 12:20:21 PM
Where You Stand Depends On Where You Sit
A great and timely journalistic effort here – and some very interesting comments!

Whether you "love" or "hate" "the cloud" (as if there were only one!), enterprise adoption of cloud computing is more of a reality than a threat. A recent enterprise cloud adoption report from a company called Cloud Sherpas found that 75 percent of enterprises worldwide are using or implementing at least one cloud-based application, and an additional five percent of enterprises surveyed are "kicking tires" in the cloud. And if that's not convincing, I suggest taking a look at the customer success stories proffered by companies such as ServiceNow, and the growing enterprise adoption of solutions such as Amazon Web Services.

As Andrew's fine summary hints at in the last slide, a lot of IT antipathy about cloud computing is perception-driven. If you're an IT person who thinks that your value to your enterprise is measured accurately by the number of servers you manage or "control," you're probably not a cloud computing fan. You're also probably not likely to retain your position indefinitely.

IT's actual and perceived value is increasingly determined by user experience and effects on enterprise agility, resilience, and trustworthiness ("ART"). While these are often related to more granular, insular, "inside-the-silicon-beltway" issues such as server uptime, but the focus is increasingly and should be on how the business perceives its ability to do business effectively. The smartest IT and business decision makers I've met and worked with consistently look at cloud computing and other technological options through this lens. Those that do not are the ones who are still mired in what I see as an increasingly irrelevant debate about whether or not cloud computing is sufficiently secure, robust, or whatever to be worthy of consideration.

Or as my sainted mother liked to say about opinions in general, "where you stand depends on where you sit."
Andrew Froehlich
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Andrew Froehlich,
User Rank: Moderator
5/27/2015 | 9:33:45 AM
Re: The other side of Cloud
And that's fine. Your org made an evaluation, and decided that things like cloud computing and webmail were too risky today. But I have to assume that someone is continuously re-evaluating these decisions as time goes on.

The concept of perimeter security, where we keep all of our data behind iron doors, seems to be going away. Security vendors are focusing attiention on things like MDM and DLP to address data security when it's outside of the corporate peremiter. And as these security technologies mature, your company may reach an acceptable comfort level and actually give cloud computing a try. 

Thanks for the comments!
larryuxc
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larryuxc,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/27/2015 | 2:03:05 AM
Re: The other side of Cloud
I work for an SAP SI and we are rapidly scaling up our Cloud business due to demand (Public and Private). We are definitely not seeing this as a scale issue. We have 'traditional' B1 customers (SME) up to large scale enterprises and government agencies moving SAP environments to Public Cloud bypassing Private Cloud. Given SAP's success in the manufacturing sector guess where we are seeing significant interest?

There are a myriad of technical, commercial and organisational reasons for going down the cloud. Cost savings was once touted as the primary reason for moving but this is not the only driver we are seeing. Seeking organisational flexibility via reduced reliance on internal IT staff and traditional vendors is becoming common.

The growth of AWS (more than 1 million active customers) and the diversity of organisations utilising their services demonstrate that Cloud is simply not just serving do-nothing companies like Facebook or Twitter. For example, ""Rio Tinto is on an ambitious journey to a world-class information systems and technology (IS&T) delivery model that is innovative, adaptable and cost-effective, fully supporting our business priorities and group operating model," said Simon Benney, CIO at Rio Tinto Group."

You only have to look at where the "traditional" enterprise application vendors like Oracle and SAP are seeing growth to realise the massive transformation that is well and truly underway in the IT market.
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