Cloud // Software as a Service
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3/13/2014
06:24 PM
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Google Drive Chops Prices

Google Drive blows past other online storage services by tripling free space to 15 GB and cutting prices across the board.

(Source: JD Hancock/Flickr)
(Source: JD Hancock/Flickr)

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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 4:06:34 PM
Re: Competition!
What do you think is the magic price here? Has Google reached it yet?
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 3:54:42 PM
Re: Google needs to make a categorical statement: No Drive snooping
>They need to make a categorical statement that they won't examine your information in Drive.

I'd like to see that too, but I suspect it won't happen. Drive users, however, can still encrypt files locally and upload them. 
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 1:31:55 PM
Google needs to make a categorical statement: No Drive snooping
In the past, Google has said it is free to view your information as a better way to bring the world's information to you. It's in your interest, so just let us do what we do best. They need to make a categorical statement that they won't examine your information in Drive. I do agree storage on Drive is probably more secure than on your computer or disk at home, and it's a good strategy to use it as recovery site if you lose the former.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
3/14/2014 | 11:12:06 AM
What does Google know?
What I'm concerned about is what Google does with this info? For corporate customers, they likely keep hands off. I can't imagine businesses using them otherwise. But for consumer use, I simply won't ever trust Google, no matter what they say. In the past they've denied a number of things that later turned out to be true.
Alison_Diana
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50%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 9:09:12 AM
Price Drops Alone?
Not sure if cutting prices will be enough to counter the public and corporate fears about NSA's intrusion into privacy and confidentiality. I think the technology industry must work together (perhaps in collaboration with individual government reps) to clarify or change the laws to protect data from warrantless searches. Only then, perhaps, will those fears be allayed. We've seen a number of non-US organizations move away from contracts with US cloud service providers post-Snowden -- and those are only the ones that went public. Who knows how many others never even made it to the board rooms of public companies?
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 9:03:43 AM
Re: .gov is watching so no thanks.
If you do choose to store data on a drive of some kind though, it's important to keep a copy offsite somewhere in case of fire, water damage, break-in, or some other disaster, natural or man-made. Granted, you may not have immediate access as you would in the case of cloud backup, but you will at least have copies for future recovery. Of course, it's important to keep data up-to-date, too.
anon6566929770
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50%
anon6566929770,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 2:07:19 AM
Storage space should be free
Why would you even pay for online storage space when you can possibly get all the storage you need with Copywith a little bit of referral effort?
Gary_EL
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50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
3/13/2014 | 10:31:31 PM
SpiderOak
Never mind the NSA, but I wonder what would happen if the police or the DA were convinced that some important evidence relevant to a major felony is stored with SpiderOak. Maybe there isn't an "encryption key," but I'll bet the local authorities will get what they want, one way or the other. Anybody who's got something to hide should keep it offline.
Truthis!
50%
50%
Truthis!,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 8:55:10 PM
Competition!
Seems like they all are dropping.
anon1172221635
100%
0%
anon1172221635,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 7:16:58 PM
.gov is watching so no thanks.
.gov is watching so no thanks. My local 2tb hard drive for 60 dollars works fine
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