Cloud // Software as a Service
News
2/12/2009
10:32 AM
50%
50%

IBM To Deliver Software Via Amazon's Cloud

Big Blue has partnered with the e-commerce giant to launch a next-generation Internet service.

IBM said Wednesday that it plans to use Amazon.com's Web services infrastructure to deliver software to customers via the Internet.

Under the so-called cloud computing arrangement, IBM will offer a number of products through Amazon Web Services, including DB2, Informix Dynamic Server, WebSphere Portal, Lotus Web Content Management, WebSphere sMash, and Novell's SUSE Linux operating system.

"This relationship with Amazon Web Services provides our customers with a new way to use IBM software and broadens our distribution channels," said Dave Mitchell, director of strategy and emerging business for IBM's software unit, in a statement.

IBM also has made available, at no charge, Amazon Machine Images -- a test environment that businesses can use to assess whether their applications are suitable for Amazon's cloud environment.

"Extending IBM software to the cloud via Amazon EC2 will help even more businesses take advantage of the benefits of the reliable, scalable, and cost efficient infrastructure in the cloud," said Terry Wise, director of business development for Amazon Web Services.

Cloud computing represents a growing trend in which computer users tap the Internet to access software that is remotely stored on centralized servers, rather than on their own hard drives. In addition to IBM, Microsoft, Google, Oracle, and many other software vendors have released cloud-based offerings in recent months.

Advocates of the architecture say it's more cost-effective and efficient than traditional client-server setups, and that it requires less maintenance. The city of Washington, D.C., recently moved the bulk of its software applications to Google's Web-based Google Apps service in an effort to realize such benefits.

Skeptics, however, caution that cloud computing presents security and uptime challenges, and note that an Internet outage could cause a business to lose access to mission-critical applications.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
8 Steps to Modern Service Management
8 Steps to Modern Service Management
ITSM as we know it is dead. SaaS helped kill it, and CIOs should be thankful. Hereís what comes next.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 7, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program!
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.