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Google, MySpace Come Crashing Back To Earth

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Google, MySpace Come Crashing Back To Earth
2. Today's Top Story
    - Symantec Takes Heat For Changing Adware Advice
    Related Stories:
    - Newest Bagle Worm Threatens Legal Action
    - Thomson To Deliver Hollywood Digital Piracy Platform
3. Breaking News
    - RIM, NTP Reach $612.5 Million Settlement
    - Intel Cuts Revenue Forecast (Reuters)
    - Microsoft Charges EU With Collusion With Competitors
    - Supporters Of ICANN-VeriSign Agreement Fight Back
    - AOL To Roll Out Free E-Mail To Nonprofits (Reuters)
    - Cell Phone-Using Passengers Risk Airplane Safety: Study
    - Google Shuffles Prices Of Mini Search Appliances
    - RFID-Embedded Police Badges Debut In August
    - Visiting India, Bush Praises Outsourcing
    - PCs Crack U-Boat's Enigma Code
    - Microsoft Acquires WinTarget Storage Technology
4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web
    - Blog Buzz Helps Companies Catch Trends In The Making (Washington Post)
    - Household Pets: Remix (Worth1000.com)
    - The Cost Of Convergence...? (USA Today)
5. In Depth: Digital Music
    - DOJ Opens Probe Into Online Music Pricing: Sources (Reuters)
    - Cell Phone Users Tune Out Music And Video: Survey
    - Napster Rues Microsoft, Player Glitches (Reuters)
    - Review Roundup: Five Music Subscription Services Challenge iTunes
    - iTunes: One Billion Sold
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Itanium And Integrity--Who Are Intel And HP Trying To Convince?
7. White Papers
    - JavaSpaces Grid Technology In Capital Markets
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." -- Philip K. Dick


1. Editor's Note: Google, MySpace Come Crashing Back To Earth

Every few years, Somebody Important in the tech industry anoints a new king. Microsoft gave way to Amazon, which then begat Google, the reigning monarch. Along the way there are princes and other royalty we watch to see if they have the stuff to someday take over the crown--Marimba and dozens of others, now victims of the Internet bubble, were in that camp. And now MySpace is there, too.

Investors are getting very nervous about Google, and it appears from the reports I've read that the firm's recent Analyst Day was a far cry from last year's love-fest at the hippie-dippie cafeteria. Many are wondering if Google can stay on top, and the company's CFO didn't help engender a warm fuzzy feeling when he said--the day before the analyst meeting--that the days of big-number growth in the online search market were pretty much over.

Which is why Google needs to enter new markets like enterprise search. That makes sense. But if I were running IT at a large company, I'm not sure I'd adopt Google's enterprise search package, or any other of its software for that matter. At least not yet.

A Google senior product manager recently said the company understands and acknowledges the security and privacy risks in its Google Desktop 3 for Enterprise beta software. But the company believes, he said, it's really something that the individual corporate user needs to worry about and resolve.

Contrast that to the approach taken to enterprise search by Oracle. Larry Ellison not only talked about security being a core component of his company's enterprise search package, but Oracle also managed to get the word "security" into the product's name. Those sly dogs.

If you were an enterprise ITer, which company's package would you probably give the more serious look-see?

As for MySpace, it's having entirely different problems. The company has pretty much single-handedly defined the social networking space for the teenage-through-young-adult crowd. But what started out as a way-cool place to connect with friends old and new now has a big black cloud hanging over it. After at least a half-dozen cases of sexual predators meeting their underage victims on the MySpace site, the company's CEO said it will be taking extra security steps and hiring someone to oversee both security and education.

It's a very sad commentary indeed that something originally set up to bring happiness to a group of consumers--in this case, kids--has been so horribly twisted by a relatively few sick individuals. I'm glad MySpace is dealing with this, and I'll support the effort by continuing to try to walk the line between watching out for my teenage kids and their friends, and teaching them how to do so for themselves.

To comment on this, or read more, please see my blog entry.

Johanna Ambrosio
jambrosio@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Symantec Takes Heat For Changing Adware Advice
A noted anti-virus researcher takes the well-known anti-virus company to task for its changing adware definitions. Symantec, meanwhile, claims the high road.

Related Stories:

Newest Bagle Worm Threatens Legal Action
Another bullying Bagle worm appeared Friday, security companies warned, although this one threatens to bring on the lawyers, not the police.

Thomson To Deliver Hollywood Digital Piracy Platform
NexGuard, a suite of four applications, encrypts, decrypts, watermarks, and controls access to digital content.


3. Breaking News

RIM, NTP Reach $612.5 Million Settlement
The deal gives RIM an "unfettered right" to keep using NTP's technology to keep the BlackBerry network running.

Intel Cuts Revenue Forecast (Reuters)
Archrival AMD has recently pressured the chip giant with technology advances that have given it an edge in performance and power use, especially in the server market.

Microsoft Charges EU With Collusion With Competitors
Microsoft said the European Union worked "in secret collaboration" with Microsoft's competitors and can't be trusted to rule impartially.

Supporters Of ICANN-VeriSign Agreement Fight Back
Countering criticism over its Internet domain name settlement with VeriSign, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers Friday challenged complaints that the agreement was anticompetitive with a list of companies and organizations that support the decision.

AOL To Roll Out Free E-Mail To Nonprofits (Reuters)
In an effort to appease critics of its new pay-to-send E-mail service, AOL announced it won't charge legitimate, not-for-profit groups to authenticate and deliver their E-mails to consumers.

Cell Phone-Using Passengers Risk Airplane Safety: Study
Mobile phones can disrupt the normal operation of key cockpit instruments, especially Global Positioning System receivers, Carnegie Mellon researchers have concluded.

Google Shuffles Prices Of Mini Search Appliances
Google is searching for the right price for its Mini search appliances--the price of which seems to be fluctuating quite a bit.

RFID-Embedded Police Badges Debut In August
There's another crime-fighting weapon being added to law enforcement's arsenal, and it's not what you'd expect. Along with handcuffs, guns, and nightsticks, cops' uniforms will soon include badges with RFID chips.

Visiting India, Bush Praises Outsourcing
In Hyderabad Friday, President Bush proclaimed his longtime support for the outsourcing of U.S. jobs in general, and to India in particular.

PCs Crack U-Boat's Enigma Code
Sixty years after the end of World War II, a network of several thousand PCs has cracked a message enciphered with the famous Enigma machine.

Microsoft Acquires WinTarget Storage Technology
Software will be added to Windows Storage Server 2003 R2 for creating file-block hybrid storage devices.

All our latest news

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'News It Or Lose IT'
Microsoft accuses the EU of collusion, Apple fixes browser and OS bugs, most Americans won't use multimedia functions on cell phones, and more...

Paul Kapustka With 'VoIP Line'
Tiered, or "pay-for-play," Internet access service plans are facing some resistance in the U.S. Senate.

Stephanie Stahl With 'Port Security, Part 2'
Accenture Technology Labs uses wireless censors in containers to enhance port security.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

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-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

Blog Buzz Helps Companies Catch Trends In The Making (Washington Post)
Individual opinions blasted out in cyberspace are becoming an increasingly powerful force. Together, they form the fabric of online word of mouth that can determine the hottest new product, make or break a TV show, or set off a customer revolt.

Household Pets: Remix (Worth1000.com)
Check out this sometimes weird, sometimes funny contest of retouched photos that mix household items like a game controller with creatures like a crab. Truly geeky.

The Cost Of Convergence...? (USA Today)
MasterCard's ad spending for the Oscars: $3.4 million. Nudging viewers to its Web site to complete interactive TV commercials: priceless.


5. In Depth: Digital Music

DOJ Opens Probe Into Online Music Pricing: Sources (Reuters)
The Department of Justice's investigation closely tracks a similar exploration by New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer into the pricing of digital music downloads, the sources said.

Cell Phone Users Tune Out Music And Video: Survey
A large majority of Americans say they have no desire to watch TV or movies, or listen to music, on their cell phones.

Napster Rues Microsoft, Player Glitches (Reuters)
Napster chairman Chris Gorog, whose company has one of the best-known names in the business but has failed to put a dent in Apple's 80% online-music market share, argues that eventually the "Microsoft ecosystem" and its Windows Media format will prevail.

Review Roundup: Five Music Subscription Services Challenge iTunes
The new generation of subscription music download services is poised to give Apple's iTunes a run for its money. Which service is best?

iTunes: One Billion Sold
The billionth song-buyer will receive a prize package including a card good for $10,000 in iTunes downloads, an iMac, and 10 iPods.


6. Voice Of Authority

Itanium And Integrity--Who Are Intel And HP Trying To Convince?
The partners may be trying as hard to convince themselves as the public that they haven't wasted billions of dollars in what has now become a decades-long effort to establish a new processor architecture. Darrell Dunn explains.


7. White Papers

JavaSpaces Grid Technology In Capital Markets
This document discusses the challenges facing the designers of high-performance, low-latency pricing applications for capital markets. It discusses strategies for building a scalable pricing architecture using JavaSpaces grid technology.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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