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3/24/2014
10:08 AM
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Windows XP: Feds Brace For End Of Support

Roughly one in ten US government PCs still use Windows XP. They will be more vulnerable to attacks when XP support ends on April 8.

Graphic from NIST Draft 'Guide to Securing Microsoft Windows XP Systems for IT Professionals.'
(Image: via Flickr)
Graphic from NIST Draft "Guide to Securing Microsoft Windows XP Systems for IT Professionals."
(Image: via Flickr)

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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
4/2/2014 | 5:21:01 PM
XP behind the scenes
I was reminded by a CISO today that XP is still widely used in networks that, for instance, are simply used to manage surveillance camera systems, and that don't go through the same refreshes that desktops go through.
Indian-Art
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Indian-Art,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 10:07:09 AM
Good Options Exists

There is a very good chance Linux OS will run well with older hardware with lower specs

Switch to the free, safe, secure & awesome OS: www.ubuntu.com/download

Its the worlds most popular free OS. It has free upgrades & security updates.

For those who like the Windows look, I would recommend: www.kubuntu.com & for older computer with lower specs www.xubuntu.com or http://lubuntu.net

Or try Linux Mint: http://linuxmint.com

Because the Linux option is free & now so easy (user friendly) one must give it a try. You have so much to gain.

One can even dual boot Linux with Windows.

WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 6:22:19 PM
What next
Michael Endler has a helpful guide on what to do next:  Windows XP Game Over: 9 Upgrade Options

 

WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 6:19:28 PM
Re: The price of procrastination
Whoopty, I think there is more reason to fear than you suggest, especially those in offices. If the Target data breach teaches us anything, its that the defenses of enterprises handling millions of valuable records are only as good as their weakest links.  While a worker can say, "Hey, it's the company's/agency's machine," the fact remains, those machines still using XP will now become an open invitation to hackers.  I'm willing to bet the damage and/or cost of mitigation that will arise from hackers exploiting XP machinces will exceed what it would have cost to upgrade to Windows 7.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
3/25/2014 | 10:59:11 AM
Re: The price of procrastination
I think the days of the general public being "scared" of computers and what they can do died after the Y2K non-event. While they should still be wary, I think you're unlikely to find any real fear surrounding the Xp switchoff, because those that use it privately can upgrade without too much difficulty - for the most part - and those in offices, well it's not there machine is it? 
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 9:32:43 AM
Re: The price of procrastination
Given the shift to more risk-based security practices, one would think that the XP problem would have gotten the kind of attention Y2K generated, and agencies would have found the money.  But unfortunatley, internal politics surrounding key agency programs, and their funding, often wins out over the legitimate cries from the IT department.

 
Palaidnis
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Palaidnis,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 1:53:35 AM
Re: The price of procrastination
Procrastination, or the effect of budget cuts? XP is HOW old? Do you think IT specialists in civil service haven't been begging for money for upgrades for years? As long as no one wants to pay taxes, or fund the government, of course it will not perform to expectations. Chalk it up to the "deferred maintenance" aka "I left my check book in my car, I'll be back in a few minutes" policies demanded by certain crowds.

 
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2014 | 10:47:59 PM
The price of procrastination
It seems illogical that agencies would take the risks of not switching off XP.  But when managers are being told there's no money for equipment/software upgrades, all IT can do is say I told you so when the hackers get through.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
3/24/2014 | 11:18:29 AM
Predator's Ball
It's going to be like a wolf pack decending on a herd of sheep. I still can't believe the nonchalant

attitude that people who should know better are displaying about this whole issue.
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