10 Cool Fitness Trackers That Aren't Apple Watch - InformationWeek

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7/20/2015
08:05 AM
Kelly Sheridan
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10 Cool Fitness Trackers That Aren't Apple Watch

Recording health data is a key selling point of Apple Watch, but there are many fitness trackers that measure steps, calories, and sleep at a fraction of the cost.
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(Image: Fitbit)

(Image: Fitbit)

Few -- if any -- wearables have ever garnered the level of attention that Apple Watch has received since it was first announced in March at the company's Spring Forward event.

Over the ensuing weeks, Apple fans eagerly awaited news pertaining to the pricing and release date for Apple Watch. Non-fans watched as well, curious about the wearable that was reportedly poised to change the smartwatch market.

Even as a first-edition smartwatch, there are a few cool things that Apple Watch can do. Wearers can receive gentle taptic notifications to alert them to incoming messages, receive phone calls, and access a broad range of apps for productivity and travel.

[More health news: How Technology Is Killing Us All.]

From the get-go it was clear that health and fitness would be core priorities in developing new features for Apple Watch. During its release event, we learned about the many ways that Apple Watch is intended to keep users more conscious of their health habits.

Apple Watch measures its wearer's activity levels throughout the day and keeps track of calories burned and how much time has been spent on brisk exercise. If you've been sitting too long, it'll tell you to get up and stretch. Each week, it uses fitness history to set activity goals.

These are all useful features, and no doubt Apple Watch owners will (well, should) take advantage of them. But what about those of us who don't have, or want, an Apple Watch? Who want to track health data but don't want to pay $350 for a smartwatch to do it?

Apple Watch aside, there are plenty of fitness trackers on the market that will monitor your health and activity data for a much lower price. Take a look at some of the most popular and effective models, and see which might be a good fit for your lifestyle.

Did we miss your fitness tracker or one you've had your eye on? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2015 | 11:55:16 AM
Moov looks interesting
I am intrigued by the MOOV. I used to have a FitBit (the one that got recalled for making people get rashes) which I used daily and liked alot. However the main problem was that you couldn't swim in it. It was water resistant but not water proof. I like the idea that my fitness band can go wherever I want to and give me pointers on moving better too. for the price it sounds like a good deal. Anyone here use one and like or dislike it?
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2015 | 11:33:25 PM
Re: so...
Angelfuego, what would it take for you to change your mind? Better aethetics? Are you waiting for iteration three or four for them to work out the kinks?
Selim
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Selim,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2015 | 11:36:32 AM
Where's Tom Tom aka Nike+?
Why forget the Tom Tom watch also sold under the Nike+ brand? Although it doesn't track all day long it's great for tracking exercise: comes with a GPS for runners or swimmers and interfaces with a heart rate monitor band or a step counter. Also I bought it for less than $100 with heart rate monitor... I play soccer and it gives me an idea of how much I ran and how much of that was in each zone. The GPS for me is not as important as I don't leave the field.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2015 | 9:22:26 PM
Re: so...
I don't plan on trading my wristwatch in for an Apple Watch any time soon.  Fitness Tracking capabilities is not enough to entice me to purchase an iWatch.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2015 | 9:22:26 PM
Re: so...
I don't plan on trading my wristwatch in for an Apple Watch any time soon.  Fitness Tracking capabilities is not enough to entice me to purchase an iWatch.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2015 | 9:22:17 PM
Re: so...
I don't plan on trading my wristwatch in for an Apple Watch any time soon.  Fitness Tracking capabilities is not enough to entice me to purchase an iWatch.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2015 | 9:19:54 PM
Re: so...
I am all about the dollar. I would rather purchase an alternative fitness tracker than using a fitness tracker on the Apple Watch.
TomB872
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TomB872,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/22/2015 | 6:29:34 PM
Re: Who uses Fitbit
I've been using Fitbits of varying incarnations since they first came out -- I bought the first one pre-release. Measurements are never perfect, and I doubt they are for any device, but they are consistent enough that I was able to lose 90 pounds and greatly improve my health and fitness over the past 3 or 4 years. Any of them are just a tool, and paired with an app (Fitbit's has ranged from good to excellent) will work for you if you actually use it religiously. Their "badges" are fun, but that's not what keeps me going. I currently alternate between a Surge (watch with HR and GPS, auto sleep tracker) and a One (clip-on/pocketable.)  The recently added ability to use more than one device with their app is a huge win for me, since I don't always want to where a watch, but I always want to wear a tracker. The devices are not indestructible, but their warranty service is good. The user community is very helpful as well. If you want to monitor your activity and/or lose weight, you can do it with Fitbit. Now if I could just get the app to automatically record everything I eat...
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/21/2015 | 9:34:27 PM
Re: so...

@Davidnil what I have understood from different perople opinion is that all of us require a motivating factor to keep us going. You llok at weight machine after doing a healthy exercise and see a reduction in desired weight you will feel relaxed and will be doing exercises more consistently. I believe if you can generate a motivating source other than these products you can still achieve the desired results. I have seen many people controlling their problems with sheer dedication and hard work not with help of any of these products. I am not saying these products are useless but we can do every thing even without their help. Just be consistent.

nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/21/2015 | 9:26:47 PM
Re: so...

@Thomas true. I do not see a mass usage of these devices. I think they are tailor made for a particular group of people. I am not sure if these devices are categorically made for fitness with no other benifits attached for common people I am not seeing they are disturbing the equilibrium of the market in any sense. What I suggest is that they should be attached to some basic need product in a customized manner. In this way they will be having more utility. Like a collaboration of some sense.

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