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4/18/2014
11:05 AM
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Can Crowdsourcing Beat Dr. House?

Startup CrowdMed uses a mix of prediction market software, crowdsourcing, and gamification to help patients gain insight from hundreds of medical detectives.

(Source: CrowdMed)

(Source: CrowdMed)

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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/24/2014 | 12:46:11 AM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
What an experience, Ariella. :( They all sound very inexperienced, careless, disconsiderate. The worst part is that they didn't listen to you, who was the only one who could really tell when the time was right.

Did you, or your husband make any kind of complain after that? What excuses did they make to justify what happened? :/ 

 

-Susan  
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
4/23/2014 | 2:25:48 PM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
I think a combination of AI, crowd wisdom, and an individual doctor's experience probably adds up to the best of both worlds. As we've seen with IBM Watson, that system recommends treatment but leaves it up to the physician to actually prescribe the course of action. Yet, for all their education, doctors are human and have their own biases based on what they've seen in their practices and what they practice. Often surgeons, for example, will lean toward surgery as the cure for what ails a patient -- and that's understandable. But it may not necessarily be accurate.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
4/23/2014 | 1:37:32 PM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
@Susan they didn't send me home b/c the policy is not to do so if the water already broke, as was my case. But they insisted that my labor was not advanced enough to put me in a birthing room, so I spend most of the night in just a room with no doctor checking on me. The nurses kept insisting my contractions were "mild." When the resident finally made it to my room, I was so far advanced that the baby was born in the elevator, a they tried to move me to the floor of the birthing room.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/23/2014 | 10:43:38 AM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
Ariella,

"Health care practioners often act incredibly arrogant and ignore what patients say b/c they believe they know better."

Indeed. That after being with you for five minutes, and the fact that you have spent your whole life in your body knowing your own reactions pretty well doesn't mean a thing. 
"That's why my first baby ended up born in the hospital elevator even after I had been admitted in the hospital fo nearly 20 hours before."
 
Did they send you back home? :( Who was in the elevator with you?
 
-Susan
 
 

 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
4/23/2014 | 9:46:01 AM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
" I think it's disrespectful. How can you trust someone who doesn't believe in what you say? "



@Susan I couldn't agree with you more on this. Health care practioners often act incredibly arrogant and ignore what patients say b/c they believe they know better. That's why my first baby ended up born in the hospital elevator even after I had been admitted in the hospital fo nearly 20 hours before. 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/23/2014 | 5:27:21 AM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
Alison,

" . . . thought both the condition and the side effect were in my head . . ."

In other words, he meant: "I don't know anything about your condition, therefore, it doesn't exist."

" . . . until my husband told him about how this medication totally changed me."

Why is it that some physicians don't believe in what their patient says, but believe in anyone else? I think it's disrespectful. How can you trust someone who doesn't believe in what you say? 

 ". . . CrowdMed's tech uses the wisdom of the crowd to analytically discern which responses are most likely to be accurate . . ." 

I imagine there is a lot of big data behind that. I would like to try CrowdMed. Have you thought about it? 

The more I read about these cases we discuss here the more I want an AI as my MD. I am serious about this. 

-Susan 

 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/22/2014 | 11:22:08 PM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
Ariella, 

"or maybe they just left her practice then. I did."

That's the reason why you are still alive.

Those "doctors" should pass certain controls from time to time to make sure they are not killing people, or making their condition worse. 

-Susan
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
4/22/2014 | 9:36:43 PM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
"Maybe they all died before they could reach her" LOL @ Susan. Yes, or maybe they just left her practice then. I did.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
4/21/2014 | 9:46:17 AM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
Thank you, @Juan, for sharing this research on crowd wisdom and citizen science. I look forward to exploring the page (already bookmarked!) later this week when I have a little more time. This is a really exciting area. Not a scholar in this area by any means, the concept of crowd wisdom makes sense: When you think about it, that's how we evolved to where we are today, by each of us telling friends and family and lore getting passed down from generation to generation, from village to village. Using the power of today's tools and technologies, we can really harness fact from fiction, truth from innuendo, to reap invaluable data and knowledge from millions of connected individuals. And this is only the beginning. Very exciting!
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
4/21/2014 | 9:42:06 AM
Re: Wisdom of the Crowd
In my quest for a diagnosos I had the same experience, @Susan. The doctor, who had zero bedside manner, thought both the condition and the side effect were in my head -- until my husband told him about how this medication totally changed me. I took this medicine about 10 years ago; since then, I have read hundreds of posts on sites about the awful experiences people have had while on it. Yet this physician didn't want to hear one word about it. I understand pharmaceutical companies cannot ever replicate the tests that occur when real patients take medication for real conditions. Sites like CrowdMed give patients a useful way to share their insights and, perhaps, prevent people with the same condition from duplicating their mistakes.

The technology behind the system is what drives the crowd-given engine, a technology the founder wouldn't discuss too much because it is patented and viewed as their business differentiator. Like a stock market predictor, CrowdMed's tech uses the wisdom of the crowd to analytically discern which responses are most likely to be accurate, then shares that info with the person posing the question. 
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