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9/27/2002
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Heard At InformationWeek's Fall Conference Last Week:

HOLLYWOOD HAS LOBBIED FEDERAL LEGISLATORS to embed copy-control technology in future products, an effort many tech leaders oppose. But the two industries need each other, said Jack Valenti, CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America. Both should focus on readying the Internet to deliver easy access to film libraries for a fair price. At the moment, Valenti argued, consumers are resisting the adoption of broadband connectivity because there's not enough content to justify the cost. Scott Dinsdale, executive VP of digital strategy for the MPAA, said a solution isn't being sought quickly enough. -- Tony Kontzer


TECHNOLOGY EXECUTIVES STILL STRUGGLE with how to make less-tech-savvy company officers understand the demands of solid security. One solution, said Karlin Bohnert, chief technology officer at energy company PacifiCorp, is to go on the offensive. "You're not going to get the ROI of the classic IT investment," Bohnert said. Business-technology managers must get examples of companies that weren't secure and got burned, she said. "You have to say, 'Here's what could happen to us.'" -- David M. Ewalt
"SHRINK TO GROW" IS AN EFFECTIVE STRATEGY for innovating in today's economy, said Ameet Patel, chief technology officer at LabMorgan, a unit of financial firm J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. As part of one initiative, his company is identifying manual operations that can and should be automated in order to find innovative ways to redo these operations. That could mean holistically redesigning processes. Jon Carrow, director of global IT sourcing and acquisition for pharmaceutical company Wyeth, agreed. Sometimes, Carrow said, the slate has to be wiped clean of "bolted-on" products, procedures, and services. -- Jim Nash

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